Silicone implant rupture can be evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging; from the long-term MRI data for single-lumen breast implants, the European literature about second generation silicone-gel breast implants (1970s design), reported silent device-rupture rates of 8–15 per cent at 10-years post-implantation (15–30% of the patients).[45][46][47][48]
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
A rhinoplasty procedure, also referred to as a nose job or nose reshaping, is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries performed in the United States. Rhinoplasty procedures are generally performed to help with redefining the size of your nose, the shape of your nose, and the overall appearance of your nose. The vast majority of rhinoplasties and performed for cosmetic purposes. However, when there is a breathing issue involved, then functional rhinoplasty is performed to correct the structure of the nose and help alleviate any breathing related issues.
A breast reduction with lift surgery combines two procedures to improve the size and shape of the breasts. A reduction involves decreasing the size of overly large breasts by removing excess tissue and skin. A breast lift is done in order to raise and reshape the breasts. The breast reduction and lift procedure helps to alleviate problems caused by overly large, sagging breasts, including:
the third technological development was the double lumen breast implant device, a double-cavity prosthesis composed of a silicone breast implant contained within a saline breast implant. The two-fold, technical goal was: (i) the cosmetic benefits of silicone-gel (the inner lumen) enclosed in saline solution (the outer lumen); (ii) a breast implant device the volume of which is post-operatively adjustable. Nevertheless, the more complex design of the double-lumen breast implant suffered a device-failure rate greater than that of single-lumen breast implants. The contemporary versions of second-generation breast implant devices (presented in 1984) are the "Becker Expandable" models of breast implant, which are primarily used for breast reconstruction.
Breast implants have gotten a bad reputation from the past and the fact that they had been known to rupture. The modern-day breast implants are very well made, and it’s almost impossible to cause them to rupture. This doesn’t mean that it can never happen, but it’s exceedingly rare. The rippling and wrinkling however, is a more difficult problem to address. This tends to me more common in the saline implants than with the silicone implants due to the filling. The saline implant is just water which is less dense then the silicone gel. The gel is denser and more closely resembles the actual breast tissue. Even when if the implant is placed below the muscle, it only covers about a half to two-thirds of the implant. Therefore, along the sides or underneath the implant you may see some wrinkling or rippling, however, depending on the size of implant used it may not even be noticeable. The larger the implant used the more visible any wrinkling or rippling could become. Typically, silicone implants are recommended because the risk of any wrinkling or rippling is lower and the implant feels more natural.
Functional breast-feeding difficulties arise if the surgeon cut the milk ducts or the major nerves innervating the breast, or if the milk glands were otherwise damaged. Milk duct and nerve damage are more common if the incisions cut tissue near the nipple. The milk glands are most likely to be affected by subglandular implants (under the gland), and by large-sized breast implants, which pinch the lactiferous ducts and impede milk flow. Small-sized breast implants, and submuscular implantation, cause fewer breast-function problems; however, it is impossible to predict whether a woman who undergoes breast augmentation will be able to successfully breast feed since some women are able to breast-feed after periareolar incisions and subglandular placement and some are not able to after augmentation using submuscular and other types of surgical incisions.[101]

Since experienced surgeons are aware of these issues with saline breast implants and their need for eventual replacement, they opt to place them under the chest muscle. The chest muscle works as an extra layer of tissue over the implant, which makes for a smoother transition from the chest wall to the implant. The finished product is a more seamless transition versus a more visible and abrupt change when the implant is not placed below the pectoral muscle. As for gel breast implants, they can also be safely placed below the pretorial muscle if that is a viable option for the patient since replacement and wrinkling is less common with this type of implant.

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