Breast reduction and breast lift procedures can be great options for women who wish to reduce or alter the position of their breasts. They are also effective surgeries for any woman wanting to refine the size or shape of their breasts. So, which one should you choose? That all depends on your personal goals and expectations. Below you will find information pertaining to the differences and similarities breast reduction and breast lift procedures share, which might just help you decide which surgery is right for you.


Soya bean oil filled implants were introduced to allow better visualization and analysis of mammograms in the presence of breast implants. This is why the material inside the shells is less dense than both saline and silicone gel implants. Since the material is less cohesive the problems with these implants are similar to that of the saline implants.
It is important for patients considering rhinoplasty to understand that if their nose requires repair due to congenital malformation, illness or injury, at least part of the operation is likely to be covered by insurance. This includes situations like sports injuries, vehicular accidents, or birth defects that result in breathing problems. In most cases of cosmetic surgery, however, performed only to improve the patient’s appearance, the patient should expect to pay out-of-pocket.

Complications after breast lifts are relatively rare. The main three are bleeding, infection, and scarring. Your surgeon will give you instructions for preparing that will help lower your risk of complications. Those instructions will include such things as not smoking, making sure you are off medications that may make bleeding more likely, and taking antibiotics if necessary.

Contoured implants, also called anatomical or teardrop-shaped implants, are shaped like a natural breast and create a sloped shape when placed over the chest muscles. Round breast implants have that, well, "round" Victoria's Secret or Playboy model shape. Contoured implants may flip over if the surgeon does not create the pocket correctly, resulting in a misshapen breast. Not true with round implants. If a round breast implant flips, it still looks the same. Your decision on implant shape should be based on how you want your new breasts to look.
Adam R. Kolker, MD, explains: Although silicone breasts feel similar to real breasts, they are still man-made and don’t feel like natural breast tissue. You’ll be more likely to notice there’s an implant in a woman who began with little breast tissue than a woman who had more breast tissue to begin with. Smaller implants and those that are placed below the muscle are harder to detect.
On average, breast reduction costs between $6,500 and $12,000. This does not include additional expenses that may be involved such as any medical tests that must be done prior to surgery (e.g mammogram) surgical garments and pain medications. Many women who consider breast reduction also have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time such liposuction, breast lift and abdominoplasty to enhance the overall results. If additional procedures are performed at the same time, this could also increase your overall cost. However, there usually is a discounted rate surgeons offer for having multiple procedures performed at the same time.
It is certainly possible to lift a breast without changing the volume or removing any tissue, however, the breast will sometimes appear smaller after this procedure due to its position. It is also possible to reduce breast volume without lifting the tissue (usually via liposuction) but all reductions that are performed by making incisions will also include a lift.
Make sure your cosmetic surgeon is board certified; this ensures that he or she is specifically trained and experienced in cosmetic surgery and that your procedure will take place in an accredited facility, which is essential for your safety. Finally, don’t choose a cosmetic surgeon based on price alone. Your safety & results are too important. Most cosmetic surgeons offer financing options to help patients budget procedure costs.
Post-operative patient surveys about mental health and quality-of-life, reported improved physical health, physical appearance, social life, self-confidence, self-esteem, and satisfactory sexual functioning. Furthermore, the women reported long-term satisfaction with their breast implant outcomes; some despite having suffered medical complications that required surgical revision, either corrective or aesthetic. Likewise, in Denmark, 8 per cent of breast augmentation patients had a pre-operative history of psychiatric hospitalization.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]

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