Tip: Learn about the possible complications of breast augmentation, which include breast pain, changes in nipple sensation and hardening of the breast tissue around the implant. The FDA provides information on risks. Also, be aware that if you choose to have the implants removed, your breasts probably will not look the same as they did before surgery.
Since the early 1990s, a number of independent systemic comprehensive reviews have examined studies concerning links between silicone gel breast implants and claims of systemic diseases. The consensus of these reviews (outlined below under Safety of Breast Implants heading) is that there has been no evidence of a causal link between the implantation of saline or silicone breast implants and systemic disease After investigating this issue, the U.S. FDA has concurred and since reaffirmed that “the weight of the epidemiological evidence published in the literature does not support an association between fibromyalgia and breast implants.”. A comprehensive systemic review by Lipworth (2011) [66] concludes that "any claims that remain regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs are not supported by the scientific literature".
The Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963, was a silicone rubber envelope-sac, shaped like a teardrop, which was filled with viscous silicone-gel. To reduce the rotation of the emplaced breast implant upon the chest wall, the model 1963 prosthesis was affixed to the implant pocket with a fastener-patch, made of Dacron material (Polyethylene terephthalate), which was attached to the rear of the breast implant shell.[91]
Body type is a major factor you need to consider before going for breast augmentation. The wrong size of breasts for a particular body type can create many complications like neck and back pain. If your body is small in size and your bone structure is thin, don’t go for huge sized implants. Opt for the size that will make your body look proportional. Similarly if you have a heavy body, you might have to go for larger breast implants.
From the first half of the twentieth century, physicians used other substances as breast implant fillers—ivory, glass balls, ground rubber, ox cartilage, Terylene wool, gutta-percha, Dicora, polyethylene chips, Ivalon (polyvinyl alcohol—formaldehyde polymer sponge), a polyethylene sac with Ivalon, polyether foam sponge (Etheron), polyethylene tape (Polystan) strips wound into a ball, polyester (polyurethane foam sponge) Silastic rubber, and teflon-silicone prostheses.[111]

For my patients, I also provide a post-operative packet. This includes arnica and other ointments, gauze and tape, an ice pack, and nasal decongestant spray. If your surgeon does not provide these items to you before or after your surgery, they are all helpful during the healing process. I encourage my patients to get anti-nausea medication for the first few days following surgery as well.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.

Textured implants were designed to lessen the risk of capsular contracture, which is an excessive contraction of the scar capsule that surrounds the implant, by preventing scar tissue from forming around the implant in a uniform manner. However, studies have proven inconclusive and no firm evidence exists to support the theory that textured implants reduce the risk of capsular contracture. If a patient requires implant removal due to capsular contracture or another complication, it may be more difficult for the surgeon to remove the implant because of the adherence of tissue to the textured surface.
The 1992 ban was enacted because the FDA determined that not enough data was available to prove that the implants were safe. Since then, numerous studies have found no increased risk of breast cancer, connective tissue diseases, neurological diseases and other illnesses in women with breast implants. Studies involving thousands of women are ongoing to evaluate the safety and effective of silicone gel breast implants.
2000 European Union European Committee on Quality Assurance & Medical Devices in Plastic Surgery (EQUAM) "Additional medical studies have not demonstrated any association between silicone-gel filled breast implants and traditional auto-immune or connective tissue diseases, cancer, nor any other malignant disease. . . . EQUAM continues to believe that there is no scientific evidence that silicone allergy, silicone intoxication, atypical disease or a 'new silicone disease' exists."[34]
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