Transumbilical: a trans-umbilical breast augmentation (TUBA) is a less common implant-device emplacement technique wherein the incision is at the umbilicus (navel), and the dissection tunnels superiorly, up towards the bust. The TUBA approach allows emplacing the breast implants without producing visible scars upon the breast proper; but makes appropriate dissection and device-emplacement more technically difficult. A TUBA procedure is performed bluntly—without the endoscope's visual assistance—and is not appropriate for emplacing (pre-filled) silicone-gel implants, because of the great potential for damaging the elastomer silicone shell of the breast implant during its manual insertion through the short (~2.0 cm) incision at the navel, and because pre-filled silicone gel implants are incompressible, and cannot be inserted through so small an incision.[75]
It is most common with saline breast implants for the implant to be placed beneath the muscle. When the implant is placed below the pictorial muscle it is technically only partially under the muscle. Generally, the top half of the implant is beneath the muscle, as the chest muscle does not extend down far enough to cover the entire implant. Therefore, it doesn’t cause any significant distinction for the patient. This method is more commonly used for the saline implants due to the fact that the saline implants have the tendency to wrinkle and become brittle more often than if you were to use a silicone gel implant. However, the wrinkling and rippling is not typically visible in the lower portion of the implant, so the fact that it is not completely covered by the chest muscle does not affect its aesthetic appearance. Even when wearing certain articles of clothing where the heel or the inner portion of the breast is exposed you will not see any wrinkling.

For breast augmentation or breast enlargement procedure, our surgical specialists are able to custom design the look that each client desires in terms of the shape and size of the breast implants as well as the resulting, enhanced look. They also take into account the body structure of the client in order to further ensure that the client will be most pleased with the outcome of breast augmentation surgery. Dr. Ortega and our team of plastic surgeons provides a comprehensive, inclusive, procedural experience that begins with a personal, confidential consultation and continues through the client’s post-surgical period of convalescence.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
All patients experience some pain in their breasts, chest and/or back after surgery. Most patients take only plain acetaminophen  (Tylenol) and Celebrex as prescribed for pain control. If you are unable to take Celebrex, acetaminophen  alone may be sufficient. Begin taking acetaminophen elixir (liquid) or tablets for pain as soon as possible after surgery.  If this is not sufficient to control your pain, begin taking any prescribed narcotic(Vicodin, Percocet, Darvocet, Tylenol  #3) pain pills as directed. If you did not receive a prescription for narcotic pain medication and you feel you need something  stronger for pain control, please contact us as directed below. Prescribed narcotic pain medications can make you sick to your stomach. Take them only after you have had something to eat. I recommend you take a dose of either  acetaminophen or narcotic pain medication before you go to bed the first night or evening after surgery. Set an  alarm clock to wake yourself up 4 hours after you go to bed. Take a second dose of the same pain medication then  resume your rest until morning.  Ice application during the first 24 hours after surgery will also reduce pain and swelling. Apply ice bags to  your breasts for 20 minutes at a time followed by 10 minutes of rest. In other words, apply ice to your  breasts for 20 minutes of every half an hour. When applying the ice bags make sure there is a small amount  of water in with the ice at all times. Your skin should feel cool to the touch. Do not use frozen gel packs.  It is not necessary to apply ice while you are sleeping at night.
In 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) appointed the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to investigate the potential risks of operative and post-operative complications from the emplacement of silicone breast implants. The IOM's review of the safety and efficacy of silicone gel-filled breast implants, reported that the "evidence suggests diseases or conditions, such as connective tissue diseases, cancer, neurological diseases, or other systemic complaints or conditions are no more common in women with breast implants, than in women without implants" subsequent studies and systemic review found no causal link between silicone breast implants and disease.[113]
A rhinoplasty procedure, also referred to as a nose job or nose reshaping, is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries performed in the United States. Rhinoplasty procedures are generally performed to help with redefining the size of your nose, the shape of your nose, and the overall appearance of your nose. The vast majority of rhinoplasties and performed for cosmetic purposes. However, when there is a breathing issue involved, then functional rhinoplasty is performed to correct the structure of the nose and help alleviate any breathing related issues.
During your consultation, your surgeon will ask about your habits, including whether or not you smoke and what medications you take. You may have to quit smoking for a period before and after surgery to ensure proper healing. You also may have to stop taking certain medications, such as aspirin or other anti-inflammatory drugs such as Motrin or Aleve. Your surgeon will give you instructions about what you need to do.

The procedure is accomplished by using the skin of the lower pole of the breast (the part below the nipple that sits in the bra cup) to shape the whole breast into a perky dome, then straps are made of the extra skin, anchoring it to the underlying chest muscle so that there is virtually no chance of repeat sagging.  The skin that above your nipple and below your collar bone is utilized to cover the perky, lifted dome that has been created and then a new (usually smaller) circular opening for the areola is placed at the high point of the cone, creating your new lifted, full and shapely breast.
In the mid-twentieth century, Morton I. Berson, in 1945, and Jacques Maliniac, in 1950, each performed flap-based breast augmentations by rotating the patient's chest wall tissue into the breast to increase its volume. Furthermore, throughout the 1950s and the 1960s, plastic surgeons used synthetic fillers—including silicone injections received by some 50,000 women, from which developed silicone granulomas and breast hardening that required treatment by mastectomy.[112] In 1961, the American plastic surgeons Thomas Cronin and Frank Gerow, and the Dow Corning Corporation, developed the first silicone breast prosthesis, filled with silicone gel; in due course, the first augmentation mammoplasty was performed in 1962 using the Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963. In 1964, the French company Laboratoires Arion developed and manufactured the saline breast implant, filled with saline solution, and then introduced for use as a medical device in 1964.[88]
After surgery, patients should be prepared for the cost of any pain medication they will take during recovery. These costs are not typically included in the overall cost of surgery. At my practice, we provide homeopathic medications as part of our total surgical package. Your surgeon can explain to you any prescription or homeopathic medications you may be prescribed and discuss their cost.
The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
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