Healing from a breast implant surgery is not a set timeline. Each patient is different and their body heals at different rates. The actual incision made on the breast will typically heal in about 3-5 days. There will also be absorbable sutures that typically can be removed after 45 days. There will also be bruising present after the surgery, and it can take about one to two weeks to completely disappear. Most pain felt from this surgery is from the muscle being stretched. Generally the patient will be prescribed a pain medication, and depending on their situation their Doctor may also prescribe a muscle relaxant to help the muscle adapt to the new implant. Most patients have reported that after three to four days the pain has significantly subsided and they are able to resume normal activities, such as, driving. The Doctor will also be able to show you various exercises that will help the muscle stretch and assist the implants with settling not the new space more quickly.
In general, silicone-gel-filled implants are smoother, softer and feel more like natural breast tissue than their saline-filled counterparts. Silicone implants feel like a semisolid gel, while saline implants are often likened to water balloons. Silicone-gel implants are also less likely to wrinkle and ripple than saline breast implants. Wrinkling is actually considered one of the major disadvantages of saline implants. The thinner the woman and the less breast tissue she has, the more likely the saline implant's crinkles and wrinkles will be felt and even seen.
Implants come in various sizes, and your surgeon will guide you on choosing the right size to help you achieve the look you desire. In addition, your surgeon will help you decide whether you want a more natural, teardrop shape or a more rounded look. Implants also come with either smooth our textured shell surfaces, and your surgeon will help you decide which is best for you.
You won’t be feeling 100 percent after that week, but you’ll be in good-enough shape to head back to the office if your job doesn’t require manual labor. However, if the implant is placed behind the muscle instead of on top (many women choose to do this for a more realistic look and less chance of a scar shell forming around the implant), recovery will be a little harder and you might be sore longer.
It has been shown that the rates of capsular contraction are much lower when the breast implant is placed below the muscle. Also, with the implant below the muscle, there is that extra layer of tissue between the visible part of the breast and the implant, therefore making it more difficult to be detected by touch and maintain the natural feeling of the breast. The breast will look more natural with this method as you will not be able to visibly see the edges of the implant.
There are two main types of implants for you to consider: saline and silicone. Most people say the silicone implants feel and look more natural than saline, but they cost more. Silicone implants are typically about $1,000 more than saline, but if you’re interested in gummy bear implants—a type of silicone implant—expect to pay even more. In a RealSelf Q&A, Omaha, Nebraska plastic surgeon Dr. Richard J. Bruneteau says you should expect to pay “about $500 more than standard silicone implants.”
Since experienced surgeons are aware of these issues with saline breast implants and their need for eventual replacement, they opt to place them under the chest muscle. The chest muscle works as an extra layer of tissue over the implant, which makes for a smoother transition from the chest wall to the implant. The finished product is a more seamless transition versus a more visible and abrupt change when the implant is not placed below the pectoral muscle. As for gel breast implants, they can also be safely placed below the pretorial muscle if that is a viable option for the patient since replacement and wrinkling is less common with this type of implant.
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