There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.
The first step toward finding out if you are a candidate is a thorough consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing breast augmentation. He or she will examine your breasts, your skin tone and the rest of your anatomy to help determine if you are an appropriate candidate. You also may have the option of viewing plastic surgery photos from past patients to better gauge expectations. Other factors, including breast augmentation cost and whether your lifestyle and commitments will allow you to take enough time off to recuperate properly, also play a role in determining your candidacy.
Breast implants have gotten a bad reputation from the past and the fact that they had been known to rupture. The modern-day breast implants are very well made, and it’s almost impossible to cause them to rupture. This doesn’t mean that it can never happen, but it’s exceedingly rare. The rippling and wrinkling however, is a more difficult problem to address. This tends to me more common in the saline implants than with the silicone implants due to the filling. The saline implant is just water which is less dense then the silicone gel. The gel is denser and more closely resembles the actual breast tissue. Even when if the implant is placed below the muscle, it only covers about a half to two-thirds of the implant. Therefore, along the sides or underneath the implant you may see some wrinkling or rippling, however, depending on the size of implant used it may not even be noticeable. The larger the implant used the more visible any wrinkling or rippling could become. Typically, silicone implants are recommended because the risk of any wrinkling or rippling is lower and the implant feels more natural.
Implants come in various sizes, and your surgeon will guide you on choosing the right size to help you achieve the look you desire. In addition, your surgeon will help you decide whether you want a more natural, teardrop shape or a more rounded look. Implants also come with either smooth our textured shell surfaces, and your surgeon will help you decide which is best for you.
The best reaction came from my mum, who is always honest. She isn’t afraid to tell me I look tired, pale or spotty, but when I saw her after my treatment she couldn’t have been more complimentary. After confiding in her that I had botox she yelped and said, ‘Wow you did really need it, now you look so fresh, like you’ve had a month of great sleep’. Thanks mum.
A: A breast reduction with lift procedure is tailored to your exact needs. You may be a candidate if your breasts are fully developed, you are experiencing physical or emotional discomfort caused by overly large breasts, are in good health, and have realistic expectations for the results of your surgery. A consultation with your doctor will help you determine the exact procedure you need.

If you have very small areola, that might make areola incision more difficult, says Dr. Doft. Scarring is also something to consider talking to your doctor about. Dr. Norman Rowe, MD, says that for some women who want to go topless, they’d prefer to use the areola incision method, while others want to use the underarm incision so they can wear tank tops freely.
the third technological development was the double lumen breast implant device, a double-cavity prosthesis composed of a silicone breast implant contained within a saline breast implant. The two-fold, technical goal was: (i) the cosmetic benefits of silicone-gel (the inner lumen) enclosed in saline solution (the outer lumen); (ii) a breast implant device the volume of which is post-operatively adjustable. Nevertheless, the more complex design of the double-lumen breast implant suffered a device-failure rate greater than that of single-lumen breast implants. The contemporary versions of second-generation breast implant devices (presented in 1984) are the "Becker Expandable" models of breast implant, which are primarily used for breast reconstruction.
When the patient is unsatisfied with the outcome of the augmentation mammoplasty; or when technical or medical complications occur; or because of the breast implants’ limited product life, it is likely she might require replacing the breast implants. Common revision surgery indications include major and minor medical complications, capsular contracture, shell rupture, and device deflation.[44] Revision incidence rates were greater for breast reconstruction patients, because of the post-mastectomy changes to the soft-tissues and to the skin envelope of the breast, and to the anatomical borders of the breast, especially in women who received adjuvant external radiation therapy.[44] Moreover, besides breast reconstruction, breast cancer patients usually undergo revision surgery of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), and symmetry procedures upon the opposite breast, to create a bust of natural appearance, size, form, and feel. Carefully matching the type and size of the breast implants to the patient's pectoral soft-tissue characteristics reduces the incidence of revision surgery. Appropriate tissue matching, implant selection, and proper implantation technique, the re-operation rate was 3 percent at the 7-year-mark, compared with the re-operation rate of 20 per cent at the 3-year-mark, as reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[64][65]
When trying to determine the best implant size for your surgery, this is where you need to be very honest and exact about what you want. There is no need to feel embarrassed or shy about what you are wanting, but if you don’t accurately communicate your expectations to your Surgeon they will not be able to give you what you want. If you want an exaggerated fake look than say so, if you want an enhanced natural look that that is what you tell the Surgeon. Based on the look you are wanting the Doctor will be able make recommendations for you to achieve your desired result. There are so many varieties of implants that it is important that both you and your doctor are on the same page about expectations.

Does the nipple/areola sit below the crease underneath my breast? One trait cosmetic surgeons frequently look for when evaluating a breast lift candidate is the position of the nipple/areola in relation to the inframammary fold, or crease beneath the breast. Try this test: slide a plain sheet of paper underneath your breast (no bra) so it sits against the breast crease. When looking in the mirror, do your nipples sit below the top edge of the paper? If so, this is a good indication that you have enough sagging to warrant a breast lift. 

A breast lift involves both repositioning the nipple higher on the chest wall and reshaping the breast.  A breast reduction does the same but also removes breast tissue to make the breasts smaller.  If you are considering a breast reduction with lift or breast lift alone, I would recommend an in-person consultation with a plastic surgeon to allow for a thorough physical examination and a detailed discussion regarding your options to determine the best treatment plan for you.  Best of luck!
Contoured implants, also called anatomical or teardrop-shaped implants, are shaped like a natural breast and create a sloped shape when placed over the chest muscles. Round breast implants have that, well, "round" Victoria's Secret or Playboy model shape. Contoured implants may flip over if the surgeon does not create the pocket correctly, resulting in a misshapen breast. Not true with round implants. If a round breast implant flips, it still looks the same. Your decision on implant shape should be based on how you want your new breasts to look.
This type of decisions is not one that should be made in a rush or without the proper research. Typically, individuals considering having a breast augmentation have been considering this as an option and doing their research for at least a year to a year and a half. During this time, it is important to do as much research as possible in regards to what size implants they want/need, what positioning they are wanting, what type of implant that want to use, and the end result they are looking for. For some individuals they are only looking to accentuate what they already have, restore their breast after having children or losing weight, or they want a more enhanced look.
For breast augmentation or breast enlargement procedure, our surgical specialists are able to custom design the look that each client desires in terms of the shape and size of the breast implants as well as the resulting, enhanced look. They also take into account the body structure of the client in order to further ensure that the client will be most pleased with the outcome of breast augmentation surgery. Dr. Ortega and our team of plastic surgeons provides a comprehensive, inclusive, procedural experience that begins with a personal, confidential consultation and continues through the client’s post-surgical period of convalescence.
Saline-filled Breast Implants. Saline-filled breast implants are filled with sterile saline (salt water). They come in both smooth and textured shells and can be round or anatomically (tear-drop) shaped. Saline breast implants are also available in low and high profiles, and in many sizes. A saline-filled breast implant is usually empty before implantation. The doctor moves it into place during your surgery, and then fills it. The saline is administered via a process that ensures the implants remain sterile.
You will find many different answers depending on who your ask. Cost will vary depending on many factors.... first of all it differs depending on if a board certified plastic surgeon is performing the surgery or not. Also, if the surgery is performed in a hospital based operating room vs. an office setting, if a board certified anesthesiologist is involved vs. a nurse (or sometimes performing... READ MORE
Breast implants have gotten a bad reputation from the past and the fact that they had been known to rupture. The modern-day breast implants are very well made, and it’s almost impossible to cause them to rupture. This doesn’t mean that it can never happen, but it’s exceedingly rare. The rippling and wrinkling however, is a more difficult problem to address. This tends to me more common in the saline implants than with the silicone implants due to the filling. The saline implant is just water which is less dense then the silicone gel. The gel is denser and more closely resembles the actual breast tissue. Even when if the implant is placed below the muscle, it only covers about a half to two-thirds of the implant. Therefore, along the sides or underneath the implant you may see some wrinkling or rippling, however, depending on the size of implant used it may not even be noticeable. The larger the implant used the more visible any wrinkling or rippling could become. Typically, silicone implants are recommended because the risk of any wrinkling or rippling is lower and the implant feels more natural.
Firstly about surgical technique. Breast lift and reduction employ similar surgical technique, it's just that with reduction you're removing more breast tissue (because the biggest aim of a reduction is.... to reduce the size of the breast). Does breast lift remove SOME breast tissue, the answer is yes, but the AIM of the lift is more to restore the youthfulness of the breast. Both women, one wanting a reduction vs a lift need their nipple/areolar complex repositioned "up". Only the woman wanting a reduction need the volume addressed.
A lot of patients are concerned over whether or not breast implants are safe. The answer to this is yes. To date there has never been a single study performed anywhere in the world that says that breast implants are dangerous or increase your risk of either breast cancer or any other systemic diseases. Furthermore, the new implants whether saline or silicone are manufactured much better than they used to be 10 or 15 years ago which not only makes them safer but has extended their lifetime use. Even the silicone envelope that encompasses the material inside, whether saline or silicone, is much more durable than in the past. If you do chose to go with silicone implants, even in the case of a rupture, the silicone does not leak to a distant site or go into your bloodstream.
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