A breast lift involves both repositioning the nipple higher on the chest wall and reshaping the breast.  A breast reduction does the same but also removes breast tissue to make the breasts smaller.  If you are considering a breast reduction with lift or breast lift alone, I would recommend an in-person consultation with a plastic surgeon to allow for a thorough physical examination and a detailed discussion regarding your options to determine the best treatment plan for you.  Best of luck!


There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.


There’s saline, silicone, “gummy bear” (aka cohesive gel), and autologous fat, explains Dr. Rowe. For the latter, you’ll need around two to three pounds of fat to inject into the chest, and patients often need touch-ups to achieve symmetry. With saline, the implant ripples more, and some patients think that it feels heavier. If a saline implant ruptures, it’s absorbed into your body safely; however, the difference is very noticeable, so you’d likely want to see a doctor ASAP anyway, explains Dr. Doft. Silicone tends to feel more natural, hold its shape, and ripple less. Dr. Doft says the majority of her patients choose silicone.
Breast augmentation with implants is the surgical way to make your breasts fuller and perkier immediately. There are a lot of choices that are available. No specific choice is the best when it comes to breast implants. Every types of breast augmentation has its own pros and cons which needs to be considered. All women have different bodies, with different needs. The best way to choose the perfect implants is to understand the factors and your needs. Then go through your options. Always opt for the safest option and try to give your health the greatest priority while choosing breast implants and make sure you can select the option with the help of your chosen surgeon.
There’s saline, silicone, “gummy bear” (aka cohesive gel), and autologous fat, explains Dr. Rowe. For the latter, you’ll need around two to three pounds of fat to inject into the chest, and patients often need touch-ups to achieve symmetry. With saline, the implant ripples more, and some patients think that it feels heavier. If a saline implant ruptures, it’s absorbed into your body safely; however, the difference is very noticeable, so you’d likely want to see a doctor ASAP anyway, explains Dr. Doft. Silicone tends to feel more natural, hold its shape, and ripple less. Dr. Doft says the majority of her patients choose silicone.
Now, there is also the of a capsular contracture. A capsular contracture simply means that when you put an implant in a human body, your immune system or your body will recognize the implant as foreign. This is one of the main reasons the implant envelope is made from silicone and no other materials like rubber, plastic, etc. because silicone is the most medically inert substance known to man. Silicone is the least offensive material to your immune system, so your immune system is likely to detect it and say OK yes this is something foreign, but it’s not aggressive so it’s not any threat to us. Therefore, what your body will do is form a capsule around the implant, and that’s the end of the immune response.
Textured implants were designed to lessen the risk of capsular contracture, which is an excessive contraction of the scar capsule that surrounds the implant, by preventing scar tissue from forming around the implant in a uniform manner. However, studies have proven inconclusive and no firm evidence exists to support the theory that textured implants reduce the risk of capsular contracture. If a patient requires implant removal due to capsular contracture or another complication, it may be more difficult for the surgeon to remove the implant because of the adherence of tissue to the textured surface.
When the patient is unsatisfied with the outcome of the augmentation mammoplasty; or when technical or medical complications occur; or because of the breast implants’ limited product life, it is likely she might require replacing the breast implants. Common revision surgery indications include major and minor medical complications, capsular contracture, shell rupture, and device deflation.[44] Revision incidence rates were greater for breast reconstruction patients, because of the post-mastectomy changes to the soft-tissues and to the skin envelope of the breast, and to the anatomical borders of the breast, especially in women who received adjuvant external radiation therapy.[44] Moreover, besides breast reconstruction, breast cancer patients usually undergo revision surgery of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), and symmetry procedures upon the opposite breast, to create a bust of natural appearance, size, form, and feel. Carefully matching the type and size of the breast implants to the patient's pectoral soft-tissue characteristics reduces the incidence of revision surgery. Appropriate tissue matching, implant selection, and proper implantation technique, the re-operation rate was 3 percent at the 7-year-mark, compared with the re-operation rate of 20 per cent at the 3-year-mark, as reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[64][65]
Implants come in various sizes, and your surgeon will guide you on choosing the right size to help you achieve the look you desire. In addition, your surgeon will help you decide whether you want a more natural, teardrop shape or a more rounded look. Implants also come with either smooth our textured shell surfaces, and your surgeon will help you decide which is best for you.
Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but this is not something they need to worry about. This is a very valid concern but having implants will not make your mammograms less effective. As the rate of women with breast implants has increased, so has the knowledge of the radiologists and technicians, and they have become very adept at performing mammograms on women with implants. During the test and the test films produced, the implants will not obscure or hide any suspicious lesions or growths, but rather appear as a fain shadow. Any experienced radiologist will not have difficulty in viewing and/or diagnosing any suspicious lesions or detecting any breast cancer in a patient that has implants.
The type of surgery also influences your breast augmentation cost. There are a number of different methods for the breast implant procedure. (Read more about choices of placement and incision.) Some implant techniques are easier and less time consuming. The type of anesthesia used will impact the cost as well. General anesthesia (you are asleep) is more costly than a local anesthetic (you are sedated but remain awake).
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
My breast have always been too large for my tastes, and often cause me back issues, and I’m considering getting a reduction. Your article had some great information about different breast surgeries, and how they work, and I liked how you detailed the possible reasons a person should get breast reduction surgery. I’ve always had posture issues, always have back, should, and neck pain, and can only wear certain clothes due to my bust size, so according to your post, breast reduction surgery may be a good idea for me.
For me, the main area of concern is my forehead, which I’m told by all the greatest in injectables, to be the most common for those under thirty. After too many holiday sunburns, and recognising that I speak with very expressive eyebrows, the fine faint lines horizontally across my forehead have become much more prominent. So, in the name of beauty journalism I decided to give botox a try, here's what I learnt...
Twenty-five percent of women will need another surgery after 10 years because implants don’t last forever. The implant could begin to leak over time or a “scar shell” could develop around it, warping the shape and causing a need for new implants. Weight loss, pregnancy, and change in preference are other factors that could lead the patient to having another surgery after a few years.
We strongly recommend you choose an implant type with your surgeon, who will be able to match the right type to accomplish your desired results. All available implants are considered good, safe choices. However, this article will explain the pros and cons of each of the three main types of breast implants so you can get an idea of what might be the best fit for you.

She advises me that there are many conspiracies around botox- staying up right for more than two hours, is false for starters. ‘The solution takes 20 minutes to settle in your muscles, so I do advise you to stay upright for then, any longer wont make a difference’. She does however advise me not to undertake exercise that’s too strenuous or hot following the treatment (fine by me) and to carefully wash my face when I get home, not scrubbing or rubbing too hard.
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