Your surgeon can take photos of your breasts and detail your physical symptoms caused by enlarged breasts in a letter. Get in touch with your health insurer early and make sure you understand exactly what they will pay for. For example, will insurance cover such things as lab costs or anesthesiologist fees? Asking in advance will help prevent surprise costs after the surgery.
There’s definitely no denying, the B word has definitely been a talking point of late, not just in the media, but within my close circle of friends too. Would you? Wouldn’t you? Have you? Has she? I promise it’s not as ‘Real Housewives of Cheshire’ as it sounds... But whilst I'm only 28, the reality is that the constant stream of late nights, binge drinking (sorry Mum) and falling asleep with a full face of makeup on, are all starting to show their effects.
The choice between silicone breast implants or saline breast implants is a somewhat subjective question. It really depends on your specific anatomy needs and finances. Both silicone and saline implants are excellent and for most people that have adequate coverage over the breast implant, meaning they have a little bit of breast tissue or a little bit of fat left that is going to cover the implant, saline breast implants work fine. In some instances, where the patient is very thin, it might be better to use the silicone gel breast implant because there are parts of the implant, about a third to one half that are not covered by the muscle and if you don’t have enough coverage over the implant, you will see some rippling and some wrinkling of the implant. This tends to happen especially when you lean over or lean forward. Therefore, in those cases, silicone gel implants are better. In terms of how they look, they are both great breast implants and they look very similar. The silicone implants are a little bit more expensive, so if the finances are a big issue than saline implants generally work very well and can give you the desired results, but again it is more of a personal preference.
Post treatment I was a left a little red and blotchy, so I cancelled any meetings I had straight after. Although the redness soon faded I was left with a few tiny pin prick points. I am told that bruising is common, but it all depends on how sensitive your skin is. I was also left with a slight headache, almost like I’d been wearing a swim cap for a few days. This too didn’t last longer than a few hours, and wasn’t anything that two paracetamol couldn’t fix. If you do experience a headache for longer than 48 hours, or any other symptoms like nausea or visual disturbances (although rare) you are advised to contact your practitioner.

There’s definitely no denying, the B word has definitely been a talking point of late, not just in the media, but within my close circle of friends too. Would you? Wouldn’t you? Have you? Has she? I promise it’s not as ‘Real Housewives of Cheshire’ as it sounds... But whilst I'm only 28, the reality is that the constant stream of late nights, binge drinking (sorry Mum) and falling asleep with a full face of makeup on, are all starting to show their effects.
She advises me that there are many conspiracies around botox- staying up right for more than two hours, is false for starters. ‘The solution takes 20 minutes to settle in your muscles, so I do advise you to stay upright for then, any longer wont make a difference’. She does however advise me not to undertake exercise that’s too strenuous or hot following the treatment (fine by me) and to carefully wash my face when I get home, not scrubbing or rubbing too hard.

The best reaction came from my mum, who is always honest. She isn’t afraid to tell me I look tired, pale or spotty, but when I saw her after my treatment she couldn’t have been more complimentary. After confiding in her that I had botox she yelped and said, ‘Wow you did really need it, now you look so fresh, like you’ve had a month of great sleep’. Thanks mum.

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