Functional breast-feeding difficulties arise if the surgeon cut the milk ducts or the major nerves innervating the breast, or if the milk glands were otherwise damaged. Milk duct and nerve damage are more common if the incisions cut tissue near the nipple. The milk glands are most likely to be affected by subglandular implants (under the gland), and by large-sized breast implants, which pinch the lactiferous ducts and impede milk flow. Small-sized breast implants, and submuscular implantation, cause fewer breast-function problems; however, it is impossible to predict whether a woman who undergoes breast augmentation will be able to successfully breast feed since some women are able to breast-feed after periareolar incisions and subglandular placement and some are not able to after augmentation using submuscular and other types of surgical incisions.[101]
All patients experience some pain in their breasts, chest and/or back after surgery. Most patients take only plain acetaminophen  (Tylenol) and Celebrex as prescribed for pain control. If you are unable to take Celebrex, acetaminophen  alone may be sufficient. Begin taking acetaminophen elixir (liquid) or tablets for pain as soon as possible after surgery.  If this is not sufficient to control your pain, begin taking any prescribed narcotic(Vicodin, Percocet, Darvocet, Tylenol  #3) pain pills as directed. If you did not receive a prescription for narcotic pain medication and you feel you need something  stronger for pain control, please contact us as directed below. Prescribed narcotic pain medications can make you sick to your stomach. Take them only after you have had something to eat. I recommend you take a dose of either  acetaminophen or narcotic pain medication before you go to bed the first night or evening after surgery. Set an  alarm clock to wake yourself up 4 hours after you go to bed. Take a second dose of the same pain medication then  resume your rest until morning.  Ice application during the first 24 hours after surgery will also reduce pain and swelling. Apply ice bags to  your breasts for 20 minutes at a time followed by 10 minutes of rest. In other words, apply ice to your  breasts for 20 minutes of every half an hour. When applying the ice bags make sure there is a small amount  of water in with the ice at all times. Your skin should feel cool to the touch. Do not use frozen gel packs.  It is not necessary to apply ice while you are sleeping at night.
Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but this is not something they need to worry about. This is a very valid concern but having implants will not make your mammograms less effective. As the rate of women with breast implants has increased, so has the knowledge of the radiologists and technicians, and they have become very adept at performing mammograms on women with implants. During the test and the test films produced, the implants will not obscure or hide any suspicious lesions or growths, but rather appear as a fain shadow. Any experienced radiologist will not have difficulty in viewing and/or diagnosing any suspicious lesions or detecting any breast cancer in a patient that has implants.
Transumbilical: a trans-umbilical breast augmentation (TUBA) is a less common implant-device emplacement technique wherein the incision is at the umbilicus (navel), and the dissection tunnels superiorly, up towards the bust. The TUBA approach allows emplacing the breast implants without producing visible scars upon the breast proper; but makes appropriate dissection and device-emplacement more technically difficult. A TUBA procedure is performed bluntly—without the endoscope's visual assistance—and is not appropriate for emplacing (pre-filled) silicone-gel implants, because of the great potential for damaging the elastomer silicone shell of the breast implant during its manual insertion through the short (~2.0 cm) incision at the navel, and because pre-filled silicone gel implants are incompressible, and cannot be inserted through so small an incision.[75]
All patients experience some pain in their breasts, chest and/or back after surgery. Most patients take only plain acetaminophen  (Tylenol) and Celebrex as prescribed for pain control. If you are unable to take Celebrex, acetaminophen  alone may be sufficient. Begin taking acetaminophen elixir (liquid) or tablets for pain as soon as possible after surgery.  If this is not sufficient to control your pain, begin taking any prescribed narcotic(Vicodin, Percocet, Darvocet, Tylenol  #3) pain pills as directed. If you did not receive a prescription for narcotic pain medication and you feel you need something  stronger for pain control, please contact us as directed below. Prescribed narcotic pain medications can make you sick to your stomach. Take them only after you have had something to eat. I recommend you take a dose of either  acetaminophen or narcotic pain medication before you go to bed the first night or evening after surgery. Set an  alarm clock to wake yourself up 4 hours after you go to bed. Take a second dose of the same pain medication then  resume your rest until morning.  Ice application during the first 24 hours after surgery will also reduce pain and swelling. Apply ice bags to  your breasts for 20 minutes at a time followed by 10 minutes of rest. In other words, apply ice to your  breasts for 20 minutes of every half an hour. When applying the ice bags make sure there is a small amount  of water in with the ice at all times. Your skin should feel cool to the touch. Do not use frozen gel packs.  It is not necessary to apply ice while you are sleeping at night.

Dr. Cohen specializes in breast lifts, augmentations, revisions and reductions as well as breast cancer reconstructions. A long time dream of Dr. Cohen’s was to travel to developing countries and provide expert surgical care to those who have no other possible access to medical care. This became a reality in 2007 when she became a founding member and Vice President of ISMS Operation Kids.


Silicone gel filled breast implants consist of a silicone elastomer (rubber) shell pre-filled with a cohesive, gelatin-like substance that holds together uniformly while still retaining the natural give of breast tissue. Silicone gel breast implants are available in a wide range of sizes to accommodate women with different body types and aesthetic goals. Projections from moderate to high provide you with choices for the amount of projection of the breast silhouette. 

MENTOR® MemoryGel® Breast Implants, MENTOR® MemoryShape® Breast Implants, and MENTOR® Saline-filled Breast Implants are indicated for breast augmentation in women (at least 22 years old for MemoryGel® Implants and MemoryShape® Implants, and 18 years old for Saline Implants) or for breast reconstruction. Breast implant surgery should not be performed in women with active infection anywhere in their body, with existing cancer or pre-cancer of their breast who have not received adequate treatment for those conditions, or who are currently pregnant or nursing.

The good news is that both types of implants are considered safe. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed silicone implants from the consumer market in 1992 as a precautionary measure after conflicting reports of possible complications surfaced. Some of these complications required breast implant removal. However, silicone gel-filled breast implants were fully exonerated and reapproved in 2006. (Read more about implants and the FDA.)
Body type is a major factor you need to consider before going for breast augmentation. The wrong size of breasts for a particular body type can create many complications like neck and back pain. If your body is small in size and your bone structure is thin, don’t go for huge sized implants. Opt for the size that will make your body look proportional. Similarly if you have a heavy body, you might have to go for larger breast implants.
This average total, according to the 2016 statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, is based on the surgeon’s fee only and does not include the cost of anesthesia, facilities, and materials (stitches, bandages, drapes, etc.). The price will also depend on doctor, patient, and region. The cost of reduction, though, varies greatly patient to patient. A reduction procedure could take three to four times longer than an augmentation, and the cost would reflect that.
Body type is a major factor you need to consider before going for breast augmentation. The wrong size of breasts for a particular body type can create many complications like neck and back pain. If your body is small in size and your bone structure is thin, don’t go for huge sized implants. Opt for the size that will make your body look proportional. Similarly if you have a heavy body, you might have to go for larger breast implants.
Your surgeon can take photos of your breasts and detail your physical symptoms caused by enlarged breasts in a letter. Get in touch with your health insurer early and make sure you understand exactly what they will pay for. For example, will insurance cover such things as lab costs or anesthesiologist fees? Asking in advance will help prevent surprise costs after the surgery.
Generally, you can go back to working out two to three weeks after breast lift or breast reduction surgery. This depends on how you feel. Do not lift anything that weighs more than five pounds for three weeks. Avoid contact sports for six weeks. If you had breast enlargement with a breast lift, hereafter avoid all exercises which isolate your pectoralis muscles as these can shift the implant toward you armpit. Workouts must stop if you experience discomfort in your breasts or chest. A balance of rest and reduced activity will speed up your recovery.
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.

The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
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