The first step toward finding out if you are a candidate is a thorough consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing breast augmentation. He or she will examine your breasts, your skin tone and the rest of your anatomy to help determine if you are an appropriate candidate. You also may have the option of viewing plastic surgery photos from past patients to better gauge expectations. Other factors, including breast augmentation cost and whether your lifestyle and commitments will allow you to take enough time off to recuperate properly, also play a role in determining your candidacy.
A great question that comes up often.  A breast reduction will both reduce the breast size and improve the shape of the breast while lifting it.  During this surgery, breast tissue is removed while preserving the tissue around the nipple.  The breast is then shaped and nipple placed in a higher, more ideal position.  This is essentially the breast lift component of this surgery.  With the reduction, we are accomplishing both. Hope this helps. 
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.
In 2008, the longitudinal study Excess Mortality from Suicide and other External Causes of Death Among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants (2007), reported that women who sought breast implants are almost 3 times as likely to commit suicide as are women who have not sought breast implants. Compared to the standard suicide-rate for women of the general populace, the suicide-rate for women with augmented breasts remained constant until 10-years post-implantation, yet, it increased to 4.5 times greater at the 11-year mark, and so remained until the 19-year mark, when it increased to 6 times greater at 20-years post-implantation. Moreover, additional to the suicide-risk, women with breast implants also faced a trebled death-risk from alcoholism and the abuse of prescription and recreational drugs.[12][13] Although seven studies have statistically connected a woman's breast augmentation to a greater suicide-rate, the research indicates that breast augmentation surgery does not increase the death rate; and that, in the first instance, it is the psychopathologically-inclined woman who is more likely to undergo a breast augmentation procedure.[14][15][16][17][18][19]

My breast have always been too large for my tastes, and often cause me back issues, and I’m considering getting a reduction. Your article had some great information about different breast surgeries, and how they work, and I liked how you detailed the possible reasons a person should get breast reduction surgery. I’ve always had posture issues, always have back, should, and neck pain, and can only wear certain clothes due to my bust size, so according to your post, breast reduction surgery may be a good idea for me.
Body type is a major factor you need to consider before going for breast augmentation. The wrong size of breasts for a particular body type can create many complications like neck and back pain. If your body is small in size and your bone structure is thin, don’t go for huge sized implants. Opt for the size that will make your body look proportional. Similarly if you have a heavy body, you might have to go for larger breast implants.
There’s definitely no denying, the B word has definitely been a talking point of late, not just in the media, but within my close circle of friends too. Would you? Wouldn’t you? Have you? Has she? I promise it’s not as ‘Real Housewives of Cheshire’ as it sounds... But whilst I'm only 28, the reality is that the constant stream of late nights, binge drinking (sorry Mum) and falling asleep with a full face of makeup on, are all starting to show their effects.
There are two main types of implants for you to consider: saline and silicone. Most people say the silicone implants feel and look more natural than saline, but they cost more. Silicone implants are typically about $1,000 more than saline, but if you’re interested in gummy bear implants—a type of silicone implant—expect to pay even more. In a RealSelf Q&A, Omaha, Nebraska plastic surgeon Dr. Richard J. Bruneteau says you should expect to pay “about $500 more than standard silicone implants.”
The ‘gummy bear’ implant comes in both round and teardrop shapes. They have a firmer gel, which may give a better shape and may last longer. The round gummy bear implant is often a good choice for women with looser tissues and who want a more durable implant that remains soft. The teardrop shaped gummy bear implant may be a good choice for women whose tissues are relatively tight and desire a very proportionate and natural looking enhancement with less fullness of the upper portion of the breast and more projection and fullness of the lower portion of the breast.
In 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) appointed the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to investigate the potential risks of operative and post-operative complications from the emplacement of silicone breast implants. The IOM's review of the safety and efficacy of silicone gel-filled breast implants, reported that the "evidence suggests diseases or conditions, such as connective tissue diseases, cancer, neurological diseases, or other systemic complaints or conditions are no more common in women with breast implants, than in women without implants" subsequent studies and systemic review found no causal link between silicone breast implants and disease.[113]
The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
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