Healing from a breast implant surgery is not a set timeline. Each patient is different and their body heals at different rates. The actual incision made on the breast will typically heal in about 3-5 days. There will also be absorbable sutures that typically can be removed after 45 days. There will also be bruising present after the surgery, and it can take about one to two weeks to completely disappear. Most pain felt from this surgery is from the muscle being stretched. Generally the patient will be prescribed a pain medication, and depending on their situation their Doctor may also prescribe a muscle relaxant to help the muscle adapt to the new implant. Most patients have reported that after three to four days the pain has significantly subsided and they are able to resume normal activities, such as, driving. The Doctor will also be able to show you various exercises that will help the muscle stretch and assist the implants with settling not the new space more quickly.
You won’t be feeling 100 percent after that week, but you’ll be in good-enough shape to head back to the office if your job doesn’t require manual labor. However, if the implant is placed behind the muscle instead of on top (many women choose to do this for a more realistic look and less chance of a scar shell forming around the implant), recovery will be a little harder and you might be sore longer.
When most people think about breast enhancement options they typically think of breast augmentation surgery. While there are many women who wish to increase the size of their breasts (breast augmentation continues to be the most popular plastic surgery procedure in the U.S.), there are also many women who seek to reduce or reposition their breasts without adding extra volume.
The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
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