I care about you and your concerns very much. Please call me at any time you have any questions about your breast lift or breast reduction surgery. Call if you have any excessive swelling, bleeding, soreness, fever, chills redness, or unusual wound drainage. It is particularly important if symptoms are present on only one side. During office hours (8:30AM to 4:30PM, Monday through Friday), call 952.449.4900 and we will answer your questions.  If the concern is not urgent and is able to wait until the next business day, you may leave a message at 952.449.4900 after hours or on weekends.
For my patients, I also provide a post-operative packet. This includes arnica and other ointments, gauze and tape, an ice pack, and nasal decongestant spray. If your surgeon does not provide these items to you before or after your surgery, they are all helpful during the healing process. I encourage my patients to get anti-nausea medication for the first few days following surgery as well.
Your surgeon can take photos of your breasts and detail your physical symptoms caused by enlarged breasts in a letter. Get in touch with your health insurer early and make sure you understand exactly what they will pay for. For example, will insurance cover such things as lab costs or anesthesiologist fees? Asking in advance will help prevent surprise costs after the surgery.
Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but this is not something they need to worry about. This is a very valid concern but having implants will not make your mammograms less effective. As the rate of women with breast implants has increased, so has the knowledge of the radiologists and technicians, and they have become very adept at performing mammograms on women with implants. During the test and the test films produced, the implants will not obscure or hide any suspicious lesions or growths, but rather appear as a fain shadow. Any experienced radiologist will not have difficulty in viewing and/or diagnosing any suspicious lesions or detecting any breast cancer in a patient that has implants.
For women who experience breast sagging, I would recommend a breast lift; not breast reduction surgery. Breast reduction can provide a more modest breast size by removing tissue and skin from the breasts; however, a breast lift is needed to achieve a perkier, higher-positioned breast contour. It’s very common for patients to combine their breast reduction surgery with a breast lift to achieve more comprehensive breast enhancement results.

The first step in the breast implant surgery process is a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing various types of breast surgery. During this meeting, the surgeon will perform an examination of your breast tissue, discuss your goals for surgery and tell you what you need to know about breast implants. Based on his or her examination, the surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for surgery.


Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but this is not something they need to worry about. This is a very valid concern but having implants will not make your mammograms less effective. As the rate of women with breast implants has increased, so has the knowledge of the radiologists and technicians, and they have become very adept at performing mammograms on women with implants. During the test and the test films produced, the implants will not obscure or hide any suspicious lesions or growths, but rather appear as a fain shadow. Any experienced radiologist will not have difficulty in viewing and/or diagnosing any suspicious lesions or detecting any breast cancer in a patient that has implants.
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.

You and your surgeon will decide together which incision choice is best for you: underarm incision, incision in the crease of the breast (inframammary fold), or through removal of the areola. Your doctor will take into consideration your beginning breast size and shape, breast tissue, and a number of other factors before recommending which options are best for you and your body.
The presence of radiologically opaque breast implants (either saline or silicone) might interfere with the radiographic sensitivity of the mammograph, that is, the image might not show any tumor(s) present. In this case, an Eklund view mammogram is required to ascertain either the presence or the absence of a cancerous tumor, wherein the breast implant is manually displaced against the chest wall and the breast is pulled forward, so that the mammograph can visualize a greater volume of the internal tissues; nonetheless, approximately one-third of the breast tissue remains inadequately visualized, resulting in an increased incidence of mammograms with false-negative results.[102]

the third technological development was the double lumen breast implant device, a double-cavity prosthesis composed of a silicone breast implant contained within a saline breast implant. The two-fold, technical goal was: (i) the cosmetic benefits of silicone-gel (the inner lumen) enclosed in saline solution (the outer lumen); (ii) a breast implant device the volume of which is post-operatively adjustable. Nevertheless, the more complex design of the double-lumen breast implant suffered a device-failure rate greater than that of single-lumen breast implants. The contemporary versions of second-generation breast implant devices (presented in 1984) are the "Becker Expandable" models of breast implant, which are primarily used for breast reconstruction.
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