As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.
Disclaimer: Please note, any information on this page is provided to you for educational and/or informational purposes only, and should not be construed as an endorsement of any particular procedure, product or treatment. This information is also not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. For medical concerns, including decisions about any procedure, product or treatment, visitors should always consult with their doctor or other qualified health care professional.
Your plastic surgeon will give you instructions on how to prevent these complications. If you have a high temperature, it’s a sign of an infection. If you monitor your temperature daily, you’ll be able to head off an infection in the early stages. Darkening of the skin is another red flag sign and your surgeon should be notified almost immediately. Vomiting, convulsions and loss of consciousness are signs that something needs to be checked medically – quickly.
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.
The first step in the breast implant surgery process is a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing various types of breast surgery. During this meeting, the surgeon will perform an examination of your breast tissue, discuss your goals for surgery and tell you what you need to know about breast implants. Based on his or her examination, the surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for surgery.

While you can read about all of this online, it's best to hear it straight from your doctor's mouth. Also, ask about what your doctor will do on the off chance that something goes wrong with your Botox treatment. If you have significant bruising, will he give you a discounted v-beam laser treatment to minimize the bruising? If you end up with Spock brows, will he fix them free of charge? What if your Botox wears off in a week, will he give you an additional touch-up for free? Do not be afraid to ask questions! It's better to have answers before than after.

Your plastic surgeon will give you instructions on how to prevent these complications. If you have a high temperature, it’s a sign of an infection. If you monitor your temperature daily, you’ll be able to head off an infection in the early stages. Darkening of the skin is another red flag sign and your surgeon should be notified almost immediately. Vomiting, convulsions and loss of consciousness are signs that something needs to be checked medically – quickly.
Thoroughly research surgeons who meet certain criteria before settling on one. First, make sure the surgeon is certified from the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Be wary of other “boards” that are not legitimate. Your doctor should also be a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, both of which have a very high standard of criteria and maintenance. Then make sure that the surgeon has experience in the type of surgery you’re wanting. Ask to see a body of their work and before-and-after photos. Speak to other patients. Schedule a consultation and get a feel for the surgeon’s approach.
“Patients who undergo open rhinoplasty typically have more edema (swelling) that persists longer compared to patients in whom closed rhinoplasty techniques were used,” says Dr. C. Spencer Cochran, a Dallas, Texas facial plastic surgeon, in a rhinoplasty recovery Q&A. “If the nose was surgically broken by performing osteotomies, then there is usually more swelling and bruising."
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