The total cost ranges from $5,000 to $15,000. The cost for the implants is $1,000 to $1,300; the anesthesia fee is typically $600 to $800; the facility fee typically ranges from $800 to $1,200. The remaining cost is the surgeon's fee, which typically varies more than the other fees associated with breast surgery. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the national average surgeon's fee for breast augmentation is about $3,350.
Be on the same page as your doctor - Make sure both you and your physician are clear about what facial areas you want to treat, how you ideally want them to be fixed, and what the ideal final result may be. Different people have different aesthetics. For instance, if the "frozen face" look is your doctor's definition of successful Botox but you disagree, you better make sure both of you are aiming for the same target or you'll end up with a result your doctor thinks is beautiful but you think is horrific.

Functional breast-feeding difficulties arise if the surgeon cut the milk ducts or the major nerves innervating the breast, or if the milk glands were otherwise damaged. Milk duct and nerve damage are more common if the incisions cut tissue near the nipple. The milk glands are most likely to be affected by subglandular implants (under the gland), and by large-sized breast implants, which pinch the lactiferous ducts and impede milk flow. Small-sized breast implants, and submuscular implantation, cause fewer breast-function problems; however, it is impossible to predict whether a woman who undergoes breast augmentation will be able to successfully breast feed since some women are able to breast-feed after periareolar incisions and subglandular placement and some are not able to after augmentation using submuscular and other types of surgical incisions.[101]


It is most common with saline breast implants for the implant to be placed beneath the muscle. When the implant is placed below the pictorial muscle it is technically only partially under the muscle. Generally, the top half of the implant is beneath the muscle, as the chest muscle does not extend down far enough to cover the entire implant. Therefore, it doesn’t cause any significant distinction for the patient. This method is more commonly used for the saline implants due to the fact that the saline implants have the tendency to wrinkle and become brittle more often than if you were to use a silicone gel implant. However, the wrinkling and rippling is not typically visible in the lower portion of the implant, so the fact that it is not completely covered by the chest muscle does not affect its aesthetic appearance. Even when wearing certain articles of clothing where the heel or the inner portion of the breast is exposed you will not see any wrinkling.
After care from the experts was pretty simple and didn’t require anything too strenuous. To keep results looking optimum I’m told to avoid things such as smoking, excess alcohol, sun exposure and getting stressed - which can all help break down collagen faster, decreasing the longevity of Botox. ‘I always recommend that my clients use a daily antioxidant topical serum and an SPF 50 too,’ advises Spyrou.

Since experienced surgeons are aware of these issues with saline breast implants and their need for eventual replacement, they opt to place them under the chest muscle. The chest muscle works as an extra layer of tissue over the implant, which makes for a smoother transition from the chest wall to the implant. The finished product is a more seamless transition versus a more visible and abrupt change when the implant is not placed below the pectoral muscle. As for gel breast implants, they can also be safely placed below the pretorial muscle if that is a viable option for the patient since replacement and wrinkling is less common with this type of implant.
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