The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]

Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.


Saline filled breast implants consist of a silicone elastomer (rubber) shell that is filled with a sterile saline solution at the time of surgery. Saline breast implants come in a wide range of sizes and are available with both moderate and high profiles (the amount of projection of the breast silhouette). Most women choose round implants, but contoured, or shaped, styles are also available and may be recommended for women with smaller breasts. Contoured implants are made with a textured surface designed to keep them from turning and losing their shape. A new style of round implant is Mentor's post-operatively adjustable implants, which can be adjusted in size up to 6 months after surgery.
The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.
Women all around the world want to have an attractive and proportional body. Many times, women are insecure of the way their bodies look just because they don’t think that their breasts are perkier and fuller. Women with small breast sizes tend to look for options to enhance their body shape. While the market provides various solutions, breast augmentation is the most chosen one for permanent and immediate solution to this problem. Breast augmentation can help you attain your dream body by putting implants in your breasts making them appear perkier and fuller.
Of course, the breast reduction vs. breast lift question is not really cut and dry because every woman is unique. You may be unsure of what volume you would like with the breasts in a more favorable position. Breasts may be different sizes (asymmetric). The position of the nipple may be out of proportion to the amount of breast sag. Breasts may be ‘deflated’ after pregnancy. You may have heard that breast implants are the only reliable way to lift breasts. These questions can easily be addressed at the time of your consult.
Healing from a breast implant surgery is not a set timeline. Each patient is different and their body heals at different rates. The actual incision made on the breast will typically heal in about 3-5 days. There will also be absorbable sutures that typically can be removed after 45 days. There will also be bruising present after the surgery, and it can take about one to two weeks to completely disappear. Most pain felt from this surgery is from the muscle being stretched. Generally the patient will be prescribed a pain medication, and depending on their situation their Doctor may also prescribe a muscle relaxant to help the muscle adapt to the new implant. Most patients have reported that after three to four days the pain has significantly subsided and they are able to resume normal activities, such as, driving. The Doctor will also be able to show you various exercises that will help the muscle stretch and assist the implants with settling not the new space more quickly.
Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but this is not something they need to worry about. This is a very valid concern but having implants will not make your mammograms less effective. As the rate of women with breast implants has increased, so has the knowledge of the radiologists and technicians, and they have become very adept at performing mammograms on women with implants. During the test and the test films produced, the implants will not obscure or hide any suspicious lesions or growths, but rather appear as a fain shadow. Any experienced radiologist will not have difficulty in viewing and/or diagnosing any suspicious lesions or detecting any breast cancer in a patient that has implants.
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
In the mid-twentieth century, Morton I. Berson, in 1945, and Jacques Maliniac, in 1950, each performed flap-based breast augmentations by rotating the patient's chest wall tissue into the breast to increase its volume. Furthermore, throughout the 1950s and the 1960s, plastic surgeons used synthetic fillers—including silicone injections received by some 50,000 women, from which developed silicone granulomas and breast hardening that required treatment by mastectomy.[112] In 1961, the American plastic surgeons Thomas Cronin and Frank Gerow, and the Dow Corning Corporation, developed the first silicone breast prosthesis, filled with silicone gel; in due course, the first augmentation mammoplasty was performed in 1962 using the Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963. In 1964, the French company Laboratoires Arion developed and manufactured the saline breast implant, filled with saline solution, and then introduced for use as a medical device in 1964.[88]

A breast reduction with lift surgery combines two procedures to improve the size and shape of the breasts. A reduction involves decreasing the size of overly large breasts by removing excess tissue and skin. A breast lift is done in order to raise and reshape the breasts. The breast reduction and lift procedure helps to alleviate problems caused by overly large, sagging breasts, including:
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
Adam R. Kolker, MD, explains: Although silicone breasts feel similar to real breasts, they are still man-made and don’t feel like natural breast tissue. You’ll be more likely to notice there’s an implant in a woman who began with little breast tissue than a woman who had more breast tissue to begin with. Smaller implants and those that are placed below the muscle are harder to detect.
Silicone gel implants were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for cosmetic breast augmentation in November 2006. The move ended a 14-year moratorium during which silicone gel implants were available in the U.S. only for breast reconstruction, for women who already had these implants and needed a replacement for medical reasons and for use in ongoing clinical trials.
Make sure your cosmetic surgeon is board certified; this ensures that he or she is specifically trained and experienced in cosmetic surgery and that your procedure will take place in an accredited facility, which is essential for your safety. Finally, don’t choose a cosmetic surgeon based on price alone. Your safety & results are too important. Most cosmetic surgeons offer financing options to help patients budget procedure costs.
Breast implants are available in a variety of sizes. You should decide the cup size you want if you are considering breast augmentation. It is also important to make sure that you are not opting for a size that will be too large for your breasts. Breast implants are inserted by making an incision under the breast. So make sure you don’t opt for a size that is too big for your body and chest.
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