Hello and thanks for your post and questions. It seems that you would potentially be a fantastic candidate to have a breast reduction and lift using the Bellesoma technique with NO vertical scar! With this technique you should be able to reach a smaller,  but perky and proportional breast size that fits your frame along with achieving upper pole fullness. You've provided great information - the only thing that would be more helpful in order to give you the best advice about your options would be an in-person exam.
Saline-filled Breast Implants. Saline-filled breast implants are filled with sterile saline (salt water). They come in both smooth and textured shells and can be round or anatomically (tear-drop) shaped. Saline breast implants are also available in low and high profiles, and in many sizes. A saline-filled breast implant is usually empty before implantation. The doctor moves it into place during your surgery, and then fills it. The saline is administered via a process that ensures the implants remain sterile.
If you have considerable sagging, pendulous breasts, an anchor lift, which allows a cosmetic surgeon to remove a significant amount of excess skin and sagging tissues, may yield the best results. This technique involves 3 incisions: one around the edge of the areola, one vertically from the bottom of the areola to the breast crease, and one along the inframammary fold, hidden in the breast crease. Your cosmetic surgeon may also use this technique if you are having a breast reduction with lift. While the anchor lift comes with some visible scarring, these typically will fade significantly with proper care, and are easily hidden by a bikini top.
When most people think about breast enhancement options they typically think of breast augmentation surgery. While there are many women who wish to increase the size of their breasts (breast augmentation continues to be the most popular plastic surgery procedure in the U.S.), there are also many women who seek to reduce or reposition their breasts without adding extra volume.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
It is certainly possible to lift a breast without changing the volume or removing any tissue, however, the breast will sometimes appear smaller after this procedure due to its position. It is also possible to reduce breast volume without lifting the tissue (usually via liposuction) but all reductions that are performed by making incisions will also include a lift.

For breast augmentation or breast enlargement procedure, our surgical specialists are able to custom design the look that each client desires in terms of the shape and size of the breast implants as well as the resulting, enhanced look. They also take into account the body structure of the client in order to further ensure that the client will be most pleased with the outcome of breast augmentation surgery. Dr. Ortega and our team of plastic surgeons provides a comprehensive, inclusive, procedural experience that begins with a personal, confidential consultation and continues through the client’s post-surgical period of convalescence.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of women undergo breast implant surgery, a plastic surgery procedure designed to improve the appearance of the breasts. Also called breast augmentation surgery, most women undergo the procedure to enlarge breasts that are naturally small, though some have it to correct disproportionate breasts or repair breast deformities.
In the past, concerns emerged that silicone implants posed health risks, including an increased risk of systemic diseases such as lupus and arthritis. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a moratorium on silicone implants in 1992 so the safety of these devices could be studied. However, in 2006 the agency concluded that there was no evidence of risk and lifted the moratorium.
The good news is that both types of implants are considered safe. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed silicone implants from the consumer market in 1992 as a precautionary measure after conflicting reports of possible complications surfaced. Some of these complications required breast implant removal. However, silicone gel-filled breast implants were fully exonerated and reapproved in 2006. (Read more about implants and the FDA.)
In surgical practice, for the reconstruction of a breast, the tissue expander device is a temporary breast prosthesis used to form and establish an implant pocket for the future permanent breast implant. For the correction of male breast defects and deformities, the pectoral implant is the breast prosthesis used for the reconstruction and the aesthetic repair of a man's chest wall (see: gynecomastia and mastopexy).
Transumbilical: a trans-umbilical breast augmentation (TUBA) is a less common implant-device emplacement technique wherein the incision is at the umbilicus (navel), and the dissection tunnels superiorly, up towards the bust. The TUBA approach allows emplacing the breast implants without producing visible scars upon the breast proper; but makes appropriate dissection and device-emplacement more technically difficult. A TUBA procedure is performed bluntly—without the endoscope's visual assistance—and is not appropriate for emplacing (pre-filled) silicone-gel implants, because of the great potential for damaging the elastomer silicone shell of the breast implant during its manual insertion through the short (~2.0 cm) incision at the navel, and because pre-filled silicone gel implants are incompressible, and cannot be inserted through so small an incision.[75]
“Patients who undergo open rhinoplasty typically have more edema (swelling) that persists longer compared to patients in whom closed rhinoplasty techniques were used,” says Dr. C. Spencer Cochran, a Dallas, Texas facial plastic surgeon, in a rhinoplasty recovery Q&A. “If the nose was surgically broken by performing osteotomies, then there is usually more swelling and bruising." 
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