Adam R. Kolker, MD, explains: Although silicone breasts feel similar to real breasts, they are still man-made and don’t feel like natural breast tissue. You’ll be more likely to notice there’s an implant in a woman who began with little breast tissue than a woman who had more breast tissue to begin with. Smaller implants and those that are placed below the muscle are harder to detect.
Submuscular: the breast implant is emplaced beneath the pectoralis major muscle, without releasing the inferior origin of the muscle proper. Total muscular coverage of the implant can be achieved by releasing the lateral muscles of the chest wall—either the serratus muscle or the pectoralis minor muscle, or both—and suturing it, or them, to the pectoralis major muscle. In breast reconstruction surgery, the submuscular implantation approach effects maximal coverage of the breast implants. This technique is rarely used in cosmetic surgery due to high risk of animation deformities.
How long you are off work depends on your occupation. If you do clerical work (i.e. stockbroker, teacher, or programmer), you can return to work when you feel up to it. This usually takes about two to three days. Do not go to work for three weeks if you do manual labor (i.e. entertainer, truck driver or personal trainer). Regardless of your employment, do not lift anything weighing more than five pounds for three weeks.

For example, if you have very large breasts, sometimes the only reduction that can be made is to detach the nipples and areolas completely from the underlying tissues. If this is done, you will lose sensation in your nipples. Thus, you must think carefully about what will happen during the surgery – and whether or not you can live with the results.
There’s saline, silicone, “gummy bear” (aka cohesive gel), and autologous fat, explains Dr. Rowe. For the latter, you’ll need around two to three pounds of fat to inject into the chest, and patients often need touch-ups to achieve symmetry. With saline, the implant ripples more, and some patients think that it feels heavier. If a saline implant ruptures, it’s absorbed into your body safely; however, the difference is very noticeable, so you’d likely want to see a doctor ASAP anyway, explains Dr. Doft. Silicone tends to feel more natural, hold its shape, and ripple less. Dr. Doft says the majority of her patients choose silicone.

The saline breast implant—filled with saline solution (biological-concentration salt water 0.90% w/v of NaCl, ca. 300 mOsm/L.)—was first manufactured by the Laboratoires Arion company, in France, and was introduced for use as a prosthetic medical device in 1964. The contemporary models of saline breast implant are manufactured with thicker, room-temperature vulcanized (RTV) shells made of a silicone elastomer. The study In vitro Deflation of Pre-filled Saline Breast Implants (2006) reported that the rates of deflation (filler leakage) of the pre-filled saline breast implant made it a second-choice prosthesis for corrective breast surgery.[88] Nonetheless, in the 1990s, the saline breast implant was the prosthesis most common device used for breast augmentation surgery in the United States, because of the U.S. FDA's restriction against the implantation of silicone-filled breast implants outside of clinical studies. Saline breast implants have enjoyed little popularity in the rest of the world, possessing negligible market share.
2000 European Union European Committee on Quality Assurance & Medical Devices in Plastic Surgery (EQUAM) "Additional medical studies have not demonstrated any association between silicone-gel filled breast implants and traditional auto-immune or connective tissue diseases, cancer, nor any other malignant disease. . . . EQUAM continues to believe that there is no scientific evidence that silicone allergy, silicone intoxication, atypical disease or a 'new silicone disease' exists."[34]
Round breast implants come in a wide array of sizes to accommodate women with different body types. They are also available with a moderate or high profile, which is the amount of projection of the breast profile from back to front. Most round implants have a smooth surface because they can rotate after placement without causing any change in appearance or distorting the breast shape. However, they are available with a textured surface as well.
A small, removable fill tube is left temporarily attached to the breast implant after surgery. The tube is accessible to the physician by injection through the skin. In a simple office procedure, breast implant size can be varied by adding or removing saline until you have achieved the result you desire. At this point, the fill tube is removed (again, in a routine office visit) and a self-sealing valve immediately closes and seals the breast implant.
You will find many different answers depending on who your ask. Cost will vary depending on many factors.... first of all it differs depending on if a board certified plastic surgeon is performing the surgery or not. Also, if the surgery is performed in a hospital based operating room vs. an office setting, if a board certified anesthesiologist is involved vs. a nurse (or sometimes performing... READ MORE
The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer after the implantation procedure, nor does the breast implant interfere with external beam radiation treatments (XRT); moreover, the post-treatment incidence of breast-tissue fibrosis is common, and thus a consequent increased rate of capsular contracture.[108] The study Breast Cancer Detection and Survival among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies, reported an average later stage in the diagnoses of women who developed breast cancer after undergoing breast augmentation, when compared to breast cancer patients who had not undergone breast augmentation, although this did not ultimately affect the patients prognosis. The use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105][109]
Placing the breast implants on top of the muscle, which has been the traditional procedure, can result in a slightly higher risk of contraction. This issue is a cosmetic problem, rather than a medical or health issue. Gel/Silicone implants have been placed both above and below the muscle without a significant difference in the rates of having contraction.
Subpectoral (dual plane): the breast implant is emplaced beneath the pectoralis major muscle, after the surgeon releases the inferior muscular attachments, with or without partial dissection of the subglandular plane. Resultantly, the upper pole of the implant is partially beneath the pectoralis major muscle, while the lower pole of the implant is in the subglandular plane. This implantation technique achieves maximal coverage of the upper pole of the implant, whilst allowing the expansion of the implant's lower pole; however, “animation deformity”, the movement of the implants in the subpectoral plane can be excessive for some patients.[79]
Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.
A breast implant is a prosthesis used to change the size, shape, and contour of a person's breast. In reconstructive plastic surgery, breast implants can be placed to restore a natural looking breast mound for post–mastectomy breast reconstruction patients or to correct congenital defects and deformities of the chest wall. They are also used cosmetically to enhance or enlarge the appearance of the breast through breast augmentation surgery.
It is important for patients considering rhinoplasty to understand that if their nose requires repair due to congenital malformation, illness or injury, at least part of the operation is likely to be covered by insurance. This includes situations like sports injuries, vehicular accidents, or birth defects that result in breathing problems. In most cases of cosmetic surgery, however, performed only to improve the patient’s appearance, the patient should expect to pay out-of-pocket.
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