A: During your initial consultation, you will discuss your desired results with Dr. Hochstein so he can fully understand your expectations. You will be provided with before and after photos so that you can see some of the results Dr. Hochstein has achieved with his other patients. He will examine your breasts and evaluate other factors that may affect the outcome of your surgery. This will help determine the appropriate breast size and incision location.

Does the nipple/areola sit below the crease underneath my breast? One trait cosmetic surgeons frequently look for when evaluating a breast lift candidate is the position of the nipple/areola in relation to the inframammary fold, or crease beneath the breast. Try this test: slide a plain sheet of paper underneath your breast (no bra) so it sits against the breast crease. When looking in the mirror, do your nipples sit below the top edge of the paper? If so, this is a good indication that you have enough sagging to warrant a breast lift.
I care about you and your concerns very much. Please call me at any time you have any questions about your breast lift or breast reduction surgery. Call if you have any excessive swelling, bleeding, soreness, fever, chills redness, or unusual wound drainage. It is particularly important if symptoms are present on only one side. During office hours (8:30AM to 4:30PM, Monday through Friday), call 952.449.4900 and we will answer your questions.  If the concern is not urgent and is able to wait until the next business day, you may leave a message at 952.449.4900 after hours or on weekends.
Constance Chen, MD, board-certified plastic surgeon and breast reconstruction specialist, adds that the FDA is currently looking into fat grafting to see if there’s a risk of breast cancer associated with it. Other nonsurgical augmentations with saline or injectable fillers are extremely dangerous and not recommended, says Lara Devgan, MD, board-certified plastic surgeon and RealSelf Chief Medical Officer. “We do not understand how injectable fillers interact with breast tissue in the long run,” she explains.

“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”


Thoroughly research surgeons who meet certain criteria before settling on one. First, make sure the surgeon is certified from the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Be wary of other “boards” that are not legitimate. Your doctor should also be a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, both of which have a very high standard of criteria and maintenance. Then make sure that the surgeon has experience in the type of surgery you’re wanting. Ask to see a body of their work and before-and-after photos. Speak to other patients. Schedule a consultation and get a feel for the surgeon’s approach.
However, if a patient underwent surgery in another country, but experiences post-operative complications, he or she will need to pay to travel back to the same destination if they wish to have the same doctor oversee any revisions. Revision surgery performed by a different surgeon is extremely difficult, and thus more expensive. In fact, it can cost 50 percent more than the original surgery. Therefore, it can actually be far more economical to pay for a surgery within the U.S.
Silicone gel filled breast implants consist of a silicone elastomer (rubber) shell pre-filled with a cohesive, gelatin-like substance that holds together uniformly while still retaining the natural give of breast tissue. Silicone gel breast implants are available in a wide range of sizes to accommodate women with different body types and aesthetic goals. Projections from moderate to high provide you with choices for the amount of projection of the breast silhouette.
The choice between silicone breast implants or saline breast implants is a somewhat subjective question. It really depends on your specific anatomy needs and finances. Both silicone and saline implants are excellent and for most people that have adequate coverage over the breast implant, meaning they have a little bit of breast tissue or a little bit of fat left that is going to cover the implant, saline breast implants work fine. In some instances, where the patient is very thin, it might be better to use the silicone gel breast implant because there are parts of the implant, about a third to one half that are not covered by the muscle and if you don’t have enough coverage over the implant, you will see some rippling and some wrinkling of the implant. This tends to happen especially when you lean over or lean forward. Therefore, in those cases, silicone gel implants are better. In terms of how they look, they are both great breast implants and they look very similar. The silicone implants are a little bit more expensive, so if the finances are a big issue than saline implants generally work very well and can give you the desired results, but again it is more of a personal preference.
Saline breast implants are filled with sterile saltwater. This implant type is recommended for women who do not wish to have silicone implants as well as some women who desire the 'Baywatch' look with a high degree of upper pole fullness and projection. In the right patient, saline implants can also look very natural. Saline implants are generally less popular today than silicone implants.

There is no set expiry date on breast implants, but if there are issues with the implants, meaning no structural issues then they could last forever. There is a common misconception that breast implants are only good for 10 years, however, that is only a mathematical average of how long implants last before potentially having complications. There are some cases where patients with implants experience complications within the first year and there are some cases where patients don’t experience any complications until 20 years. This is where the mathematical average of 10 years comes into play. It is important to remember that implants are not infallible. They are human made devices that do sometimes have defects which results in a leak, tear, or rupture. In general, if a patient is able to make it past the first two years without any issues with their implants, there is no need to be concerned about the life expectancy of your implant as it is possible they will last for as long as you want to. Generally, patients with implants will come back 10-15 years later to either change, remove or reduce their implants. Certainly, implants can be adjusted and changed if and when necessary, but if you’re not having any issues with the implants then you likely won’t need to do surgery in 10 years you can leave them alone.
Placing the breast implants on top of the muscle, which has been the traditional procedure, can result in a slightly higher risk of contraction. This issue is a cosmetic problem, rather than a medical or health issue. Gel/Silicone implants have been placed both above and below the muscle without a significant difference in the rates of having contraction.
The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer after the implantation procedure, nor does the breast implant interfere with external beam radiation treatments (XRT); moreover, the post-treatment incidence of breast-tissue fibrosis is common, and thus a consequent increased rate of capsular contracture.[108] The study Breast Cancer Detection and Survival among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies, reported an average later stage in the diagnoses of women who developed breast cancer after undergoing breast augmentation, when compared to breast cancer patients who had not undergone breast augmentation, although this did not ultimately affect the patients prognosis. The use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105][109]
In the past, concerns emerged that silicone implants posed health risks, including an increased risk of systemic diseases such as lupus and arthritis. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a moratorium on silicone implants in 1992 so the safety of these devices could be studied. However, in 2006 the agency concluded that there was no evidence of risk and lifted the moratorium.

Dr. Rahban estimates that 30 percent of the errors made in breast augmentation come down to incorrect size selection. “The most important thing with breast augmentation is to make sure that the implant you select is conservative and not too large for the size of your anatomy.” It’s a red flag if your doctor doesn’t seem concerned with advising you about the maximum size you can reach before developing medical complications.
The first point is placed at a distance of about one centimeter from the outer corner of the eye. Then the patient is asked to squint, if wrinkles appear above or below the first mark, additional points are applied. There is a danger of too close to the introduction of the drug, which can cause it to hang over, so the expert’s experience should not cause doubts. It is worthwhile in advance to look at the document confirming the qualification of the doctor.
The 1992 ban was enacted because the FDA determined that not enough data was available to prove that the implants were safe. Since then, numerous studies have found no increased risk of breast cancer, connective tissue diseases, neurological diseases and other illnesses in women with breast implants. Studies involving thousands of women are ongoing to evaluate the safety and effective of silicone gel breast implants.
It is also possible for implants to rupture and leak. If saline implants rupture, the saline will be safely absorbed by the body. A silicone leak may stay inside the implant shell or leak outside of the shell. When a saline implant ruptures, it will deflate. But silicone breast implants may cause no obvious symptoms when they rupture. This is called silent rupture.
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