Silicone-filled Breast Implants. Silicone-filled breast implants are filled with a silicone gel. Over the years, the consistency of this silicone filling has changed. The first silicone breast implants were filled with a very thin, oily silicone. Currently, the silicone used in implants is a gel that is less likely to leak out of the shell if it ruptures. This gel is referred to as "cohesive." Some breast implants — called gummy bear breast implants — are even more cohesive, or "form-stable," and have the consistency of a gummy bear, thus the nickname.
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Many patients return to work within the first week after breast lift surgery, depending on the nature of their jobs, and resume most daily activities after a week or so. You will need to limit exercise other than walking for the first 2-6 weeks after a breast lift; your cosmetic surgeon will provide you with detailed instructions about when it is safe to resume any activity.
Generally, you can go back to working out two to three weeks after breast lift or breast reduction surgery. This depends on how you feel. Do not lift anything that weighs more than five pounds for three weeks. Avoid contact sports for six weeks. If you had breast enlargement with a breast lift, hereafter avoid all exercises which isolate your pectoralis muscles as these can shift the implant toward you armpit. Workouts must stop if you experience discomfort in your breasts or chest. A balance of rest and reduced activity will speed up your recovery.
You and your surgeon will decide together which incision choice is best for you: underarm incision, incision in the crease of the breast (inframammary fold), or through removal of the areola. Your doctor will take into consideration your beginning breast size and shape, breast tissue, and a number of other factors before recommending which options are best for you and your body.
For example, if you have very large breasts, sometimes the only reduction that can be made is to detach the nipples and areolas completely from the underlying tissues. If this is done, you will lose sensation in your nipples. Thus, you must think carefully about what will happen during the surgery – and whether or not you can live with the results.

Hello and thanks for your post and questions. It seems that you would potentially be a fantastic candidate to have a breast reduction and lift using the Bellesoma technique with NO vertical scar! With this technique you should be able to reach a smaller,  but perky and proportional breast size that fits your frame along with achieving upper pole fullness. You've provided great information - the only thing that would be more helpful in order to give you the best advice about your options would be an in-person exam.
In 2000, the FDA approved saline breast implant Premarket Approval Applications (PMA) containing the type and rate data of the local medical complications experienced by the breast surgery patients.[116] "Despite complications experienced by some women, the majority of those women still in the Inamed Corporation and Mentor Corporation studies, after three years, reported being satisfied with their implants."[113] The premarket approvals were granted for breast augmentation, for women at least 18 years old, and for women requiring breast reconstruction.[117][118]

In 1998, the U.S. FDA approved adjunct study protocols for silicone-gel filled implants only for breast reconstruction patients and for revision-surgery patients; and also approved the Dow Corning Corporation's Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study for silicone-gel breast implants for a limited number of breast augmentation-, reconstruction-, and revision-surgery patients.[113]

Round breast implants with a smooth surface are currently used for the majority of breast augmentations in the United States and Canada. These implants tend to create a fuller appearance in the upper portion of the breasts and more distinct cleavage when placed over the muscle (subglandular implant placement). When placed under the muscle (subpectoral and submuscular implant placements), round implants create a very natural shape.
The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
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