There’s definitely no denying, the B word has definitely been a talking point of late, not just in the media, but within my close circle of friends too. Would you? Wouldn’t you? Have you? Has she? I promise it’s not as ‘Real Housewives of Cheshire’ as it sounds... But whilst I'm only 28, the reality is that the constant stream of late nights, binge drinking (sorry Mum) and falling asleep with a full face of makeup on, are all starting to show their effects.
From your description, you seem to be a very good candidate for this new technique and should really get the look that you are desiring without implants or any unnecessary visible scars. I would recommend that you search for an ABPS board certified plastic surgeon who is also a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons in your area or an area that you would like to travel to on holiday who offers the Bellesoma technique to discuss your breast reduction and possible results.  You've provided great information - the only thing that would be more helpful in order to give you the best advice about your options would be an in-person exam.
It has been shown that the rates of capsular contraction are much lower when the breast implant is placed below the muscle. Also, with the implant below the muscle, there is that extra layer of tissue between the visible part of the breast and the implant, therefore making it more difficult to be detected by touch and maintain the natural feeling of the breast. The breast will look more natural with this method as you will not be able to visibly see the edges of the implant.
The cause of capsular contracture is unknown, but the common incidence factors include bacterial contamination, device-shell rupture, filler leakage, and hematoma. The surgical implantation procedures that have reduced the incidence of capsular contracture include submuscular emplacement, the use of breast implants with a textured surface (polyurethane-coated);[55][56][57] limited pre-operative handling of the implants, limited contact with the chest skin of the implant pocket before the emplacement of the breast implant, and irrigation of the recipient site with triple-antibiotic solutions.[58][59]
In the early 1990s, the national health ministries of the listed countries reviewed the pertinent studies for causal links among silicone-gel breast implants and systemic and auto-immune diseases. The collective conclusion is that there is no evidence establishing a causal connection between the implantation of silicone breast implants and either type of disease. The Danish study Long-term Health Status of Danish Women with Silicone Breast Implants (2004) reported that women who had breast implants for an average of 19 years were no more likely to report an excessive number of rheumatic disease symptoms than would the women of the control group.[26] The follow-up study Mortality Rates Among Augmentation Mammoplasty Patients: An Update (2006) reported a decreased standardized mortality ratio and an increased risk of lung cancer death among breast implant patients, than among patients for other types of plastic surgery; the mortality rate differences were attributed to tobacco smoking.[27] The study Mortality Among Canadian Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants (2006), about some 25,000 women with breast implants, reported a 43 per cent lower rate of breast cancer among them than among the general populace, and a lower-than-average risk of cancer.[28]
‘You’ll start to see an effect after 3-5 days’, instructs cosmetic doctor Rita Rakus, ‘however it may take two weeks for maximum results to kick in’. For me, my forehead had less movement after day three, but it wasn't until a full week after the treatment that it felt completely immobile. It’s definitely a strange sensation as you go to lift your brows…but nothing moves.
The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.
The procedure is accomplished by using the skin of the lower pole of the breast (the part below the nipple that sits in the bra cup) to shape the whole breast into a perky dome, then straps are made of the extra skin, anchoring it to the underlying chest muscle so that there is virtually no chance of repeat sagging.  The skin that above your nipple and below your collar bone is utilized to cover the perky, lifted dome that has been created and then a new (usually smaller) circular opening for the areola is placed at the high point of the cone, creating your new lifted, full and shapely breast.
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.
A woman wanting a reduction comes usually after having put up with the pain and in some cases embarrassment and hassle for years before she presents in front of surgeon. She experiences neck, back, shoulder pain, skin irritation and even infection, she feels self conscious and sick of breasts getting in the way of a normal life/shopping/exercising. 
It is important for patients considering rhinoplasty to understand that if their nose requires repair due to congenital malformation, illness or injury, at least part of the operation is likely to be covered by insurance. This includes situations like sports injuries, vehicular accidents, or birth defects that result in breathing problems. In most cases of cosmetic surgery, however, performed only to improve the patient’s appearance, the patient should expect to pay out-of-pocket. 

Many patients return to work within the first week after breast lift surgery, depending on the nature of their jobs, and resume most daily activities after a week or so. You will need to limit exercise other than walking for the first 2-6 weeks after a breast lift; your cosmetic surgeon will provide you with detailed instructions about when it is safe to resume any activity.


Your surgeon can take photos of your breasts and detail your physical symptoms caused by enlarged breasts in a letter. Get in touch with your health insurer early and make sure you understand exactly what they will pay for. For example, will insurance cover such things as lab costs or anesthesiologist fees? Asking in advance will help prevent surprise costs after the surgery.

One of the biggest factors affecting the total cost is if you need to have a second surgery. Because your nose swells during the operation, the surgeon may get a false impression of the final shape of your nose. As the swelling goes down, it may become apparent that a second surgery is necessary to achieve the look you want. Approximately 15 percent of rhinoplasty surgeries require a second surgery.

Although botox is now more widely available than ever before, it’s so important you see a qualified, experienced expert, even if they are more expensive. Yes, there are some clinics that will charge you super-low prices, but remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Before booking into the Cadogen Clinic I read countless positive reviews on Facebook and Google, yes at around £300 it might not have been the cheapest, but I knew I was in safe hands. Be smart and do your research people, after all, this is your face, you don't want f*ck it up.
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