When the patient is unsatisfied with the outcome of the augmentation mammoplasty; or when technical or medical complications occur; or because of the breast implants’ limited product life, it is likely she might require replacing the breast implants. Common revision surgery indications include major and minor medical complications, capsular contracture, shell rupture, and device deflation.[44] Revision incidence rates were greater for breast reconstruction patients, because of the post-mastectomy changes to the soft-tissues and to the skin envelope of the breast, and to the anatomical borders of the breast, especially in women who received adjuvant external radiation therapy.[44] Moreover, besides breast reconstruction, breast cancer patients usually undergo revision surgery of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), and symmetry procedures upon the opposite breast, to create a bust of natural appearance, size, form, and feel. Carefully matching the type and size of the breast implants to the patient's pectoral soft-tissue characteristics reduces the incidence of revision surgery. Appropriate tissue matching, implant selection, and proper implantation technique, the re-operation rate was 3 percent at the 7-year-mark, compared with the re-operation rate of 20 per cent at the 3-year-mark, as reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[64][65]
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
I needed very little convincing before making my way down to the Cadogan Clinic, one of the very best locations in London (might I add) to speak to Nurse Libbie Wallace, a master in her field. After filling in a short consultation form, Nurse Libbie asks me how old I am. After replying 28, she chuckles a little, but continues… I’m not the youngest client she’s had walk through the door, but she does tell me that she would only ever treat those that actually can benefit from the treatment, ‘It’s important that I manage patients expectations’.

Many patients themselves are skeptical and most of the time unable to determine if they are needing a breast lift or and augmentation, but the surgeon will be able to take a look at your breast and after evaluation will be able to determine if a lift is sufficient and the best choice, or if you should look into an augmentation. One of the many things they will take into consideration is the relationship of the nipple with the breast fold aka infant mammary fold. If the nipple is significantly below that level, the patient will need a breast lift no matter what as an augmentation alone will not correct the underlying problems. If the nipple is just barely at the level of the mammary fold, it is possible that you can have just an augmentation, as it will work as a sort of internal lift for them.
A great question that comes up often.  A breast reduction will both reduce the breast size and improve the shape of the breast while lifting it.  During this surgery, breast tissue is removed while preserving the tissue around the nipple.  The breast is then shaped and nipple placed in a higher, more ideal position.  This is essentially the breast lift component of this surgery.  With the reduction, we are accomplishing both. Hope this helps. 
It is important for patients considering rhinoplasty to understand that if their nose requires repair due to congenital malformation, illness or injury, at least part of the operation is likely to be covered by insurance. This includes situations like sports injuries, vehicular accidents, or birth defects that result in breathing problems. In most cases of cosmetic surgery, however, performed only to improve the patient’s appearance, the patient should expect to pay out-of-pocket.
As mentioned above, the experience level of a surgeon plays a role in the total cost of the rhinoplasty procedure. Another big deciding factor is where that surgeon is located geographically. Typically, in large affluent markets such as New York and Beverly Hills, the cost for the surgery will be higher than those performed in smaller towns. These affluent neighborhoods have a higher cost of living which leads to higher overhead costs thus making the overall price of the surgery higher.
Hello and thanks for your post and questions. It seems that you would potentially be a fantastic candidate to have a breast reduction and lift using the Bellesoma technique with NO vertical scar! With this technique you should be able to reach a smaller,  but perky and proportional breast size that fits your frame along with achieving upper pole fullness. You've provided great information - the only thing that would be more helpful in order to give you the best advice about your options would be an in-person exam.
Swelling is a normal part of breast lift and breast reduction surgery. Swelling will involve the breasts and the tissues around the breasts as well. It can even extend onto the abdomen and the back. Elevating the head of your bed for two to three days will minimize swelling. You may sit in a chair. Applying ice to your breasts will also help. When applying the ice bags make sure there is a small amount of water in with the ice at all times. Your skin should feel cool to the touch. Do not use frozen gel packs. Reducing the swelling reduces the pain after your surgery.
As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.
Some costs for breast implant revision surgery may be covered by your surgeon, depending on the reason for revision. “Generally, if the doctor feels the result is below their expectations, they will often cover much or all of the cost,” says Seattle plastic surgeon Dr. Richard P. Rand in a RealSelf Q&A. “However, if the problem is something about your body, like capsular contracture or wrinkling and rippling above the muscle, it is reasonable that charges should apply as this is no fault of the doctor.”
The plastic surgical emplacement of breast implant devices, either for breast reconstruction or for aesthetic purpose, presents the same health risks common to surgery, such as adverse reaction to anesthesia, hematoma (post-operative bleeding), late hematoma (post-operative bleeding after 6 months or more),[21] seroma (fluid accumulation), incision-site breakdown (wound infection). Complications specific to breast augmentation include breast pain, altered sensation, impeded breast-feeding function, visible wrinkling, asymmetry, thinning of the breast tissue, and symmastia, the “bread loafing” of the bust that interrupts the natural plane between the breasts. Specific treatments for the complications of indwelling breast implants—capsular contracture and capsular rupture—are periodic MRI monitoring and physical examinations. Furthermore, complications and re-operations related to the implantation surgery, and to tissue expanders (implant place-holders during surgery) can cause unfavorable scarring in approximately 6–7 per cent of the patients. [22][23][24] Statistically, 20 per cent of women who underwent cosmetic implantation, and 50 per cent of women who underwent breast reconstruction implantation, required their explantation at the 10-year mark.[25]
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
In general, silicone-gel-filled implants are smoother, softer and feel more like natural breast tissue than their saline-filled counterparts. Silicone implants feel like a semisolid gel, while saline implants are often likened to water balloons. Silicone-gel implants are also less likely to wrinkle and ripple than saline breast implants. Wrinkling is actually considered one of the major disadvantages of saline implants. The thinner the woman and the less breast tissue she has, the more likely the saline implant's crinkles and wrinkles will be felt and even seen.

The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
Saline filled breast implants consist of a silicone elastomer (rubber) shell that is filled with a sterile saline solution at the time of surgery. Saline breast implants come in a wide range of sizes and are available with both moderate and high profiles (the amount of projection of the breast silhouette). Most women choose round implants, but contoured, or shaped, styles are also available and may be recommended for women with smaller breasts. Contoured implants are made with a textured surface designed to keep them from turning and losing their shape. A new style of round implant is Mentor's post-operatively adjustable implants, which can be adjusted in size up to 6 months after surgery.
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