Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
A discussion of your expectations. You and your doctor should talk about your motivations and expectations. He or she will explain what rhinoplasty can and can't do for you and what your results might be. It's normal to feel a little self-conscious discussing your appearance, but it's very important that you're open with your surgeon about your desires and goals for surgery.

Generally, rhinoplasty cost comprises the surgeon's fee, anesthesia fee, operating room fee and implant or grafting fee (if applicable). According to the most recent statistics from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the average surgeon's fee for a rhinoplasty is $5,223. The extent of the nose surgery also affects the price. For example, a primary rhinoplasty is not as costly as the far more involved revision rhinoplasty. In general, primary rhinoplasty costs can range from $3,000 to $8,000, and revision rhinoplasty can cost $10,000 to $15,000.
For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.
When patients are researching their payment options, they should also consider third-party financing. Many lenders offer fixed-interest repayment plans. Patients who pay within a specific time frame may even be eligible for a no-interest plan. A doctor's office team can explain more about these options and help patients choose the repayment schedule that best fits their budget.
By and large, there is no 'perfect type' of breast implant. What looked stunning on one of your best friends doesn't necessarily mean that the same implant will be the best choice for you. This is why we recommend face-to-face consultations; an honest discussion with an experienced, knowledgeable plastic surgeon about your desired enhancement is a must. And you'll want to consider your surgeon's opinion and recommendations based on your existing body type and physical assessment.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
Photographs. Someone from your doctor's office will take photographs of your nose from different angles. Your surgeon may use computer software to manipulate the photos to show you what kinds of results are possible. Your doctor will use these photos for before-and-after assessments, reference during surgery and long-term reviews. Most importantly, the photos permit a specific discussion about the goals of surgery.
To apply for insurance coverage for a functional rhinoplasty, your surgeon can perform one of several tests. A CT scan shows irregularities within the nose that are not visible to the naked eye. An acoustic rhinometry is a test that maps the inside of a patient's nose. A rhinomanometry tests the level of airflow within the nostrils. In some cases, insurance companies require that patients show that they have attempted to treat nasal obstruction with other treatments. These may include antihistamines, allergy desensitizing injections, and steroid spray.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices. The longer a woman has implants, the more likely it is that she will need to have surgery to remove or replace them. The most frequent complications and adverse outcomes experienced by breast implant patients include capsular contracture, reoperation, and implant removal (with or without replacement). Other common complications include implant rupture with deflation, wrinkling, asymmetry, scarring, pain, and infection. In addition, women with breast implants may have a very low but increased likelihood of being diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).

Rhinoplasty is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries among teenagers. It is important for teenage patients and their surgeons to consider whether or not nose reshaping is an appropriate cosmetic surgery option. Doctors should ensure that the decision to undergo rhinoplasty is the patient's own choice, rather than the result of peer or parental pressure. Regardless of the reason for surgery, doctors recommend that girls wait until age 14 or 15, and that boys wait a few additional years to undergo rhinoplasty. By this time, the nose should have finished growing. 

No. Rhinoplasty is a challenging operation. This is due to several factors. First, the nose is a complicated 3D shape that is in the middle of the face. Changes made during rhinoplasty are often very small. But these changes can make a major difference in the way the nose looks and functions. Because these changes are small, so is the margin for error.
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