MENTOR® MemoryGel® Breast Implants, MENTOR® MemoryShape® Breast Implants, and MENTOR® Saline-filled Breast Implants are indicated for breast augmentation in women (at least 22 years old for MemoryGel® Implants and MemoryShape® Implants, and 18 years old for Saline Implants) or for breast reconstruction. Breast implant surgery should not be performed in women with active infection anywhere in their body, with existing cancer or pre-cancer of their breast who have not received adequate treatment for those conditions, or who are currently pregnant or nursing.
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Most surgeons perform breast augmentations under general anesthesia, believing it offers more comfort, safety, and surgical accuracy. It’s possible to have the surgery under local anesthesia in a treatment room in their office, but ask if your doctor has privileges at a local hospital or surgery center. If they don’t, that could be a big red flag. Costs will also be lower if your anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist (CRNA) rather than an anesthesiologist (MD). While both are qualified, some patients prefer the expertise of a medical doctor.

One of the biggest factors affecting the total cost is if you need to have a second surgery. Because your nose swells during the operation, the surgeon may get a false impression of the final shape of your nose. As the swelling goes down, it may become apparent that a second surgery is necessary to achieve the look you want. Approximately 15 percent of rhinoplasty surgeries require a second surgery.


There are other pricing factors to consider as well such as the extent of your procedure, where you live, and the plastic surgeon you choose. For example, slight surgical reshaping of the nose requires less surgical time (and therefore has a lower price tag) than a complete change in shape. In general, a longer or more complicated procedure will be more expensive. This is especially true if your situation requires an overnight stay, although most rhinoplasty procedures are performed as outpatient procedures. Revision rhinoplasty (performed on patients who have had a nose surgery in the past) tends to be more complicated, and therefore costlier, than an initial procedure.

How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
Ambulatory surgical centers are more expensive than private offices. These venues are owned by a third party, and provide everything your surgeon needs to safely perform rhinoplasty and other cosmetic surgery procedures. They typically charge by the hour. Ambulatory surgical center fees are usually around $3,000 or more for a single rhinoplasty procedure.
Sometimes insurance pays for a rhinoplasty, but it depends on the insurance policy. Before scheduling surgery, your doctor's office will help you get prior written authorization from your insurance company. Although this isn't a guarantee of coverage, it's the only way to confirm that rhinoplasty is a covered benefit. Sometimes insurance will pay for a part of a nasal surgery, but not other parts. In these cases, you can contact the business office to get a quote for the operation.
There are other pricing factors to consider as well such as the extent of your procedure, where you live, and the plastic surgeon you choose. For example, slight surgical reshaping of the nose requires less surgical time (and therefore has a lower price tag) than a complete change in shape. In general, a longer or more complicated procedure will be more expensive. This is especially true if your situation requires an overnight stay, although most rhinoplasty procedures are performed as outpatient procedures. Revision rhinoplasty (performed on patients who have had a nose surgery in the past) tends to be more complicated, and therefore costlier, than an initial procedure.
Saline breast implants are filled with sterile saltwater. This implant type is recommended for women who do not wish to have silicone implants as well as some women who desire the 'Baywatch' look with a high degree of upper pole fullness and projection. In the right patient, saline implants can also look very natural. Saline implants are generally less popular today than silicone implants.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.

As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.


Patients who are unhappy with their previous nose job results are candidates for secondary rhinoplasty. Whether the nose is deemed too small, too large, or improperly shaped, a skilled surgeon may be able to correct the problem. Patients who experience breathing difficulties following rhinoplasty may also opt to undergo a second procedure. Factors influencing candidacy for revision rhinoplasty include:
Many individuals will be surprised to learn that cosmetic breast procedures are not solely limited to women. Breast reduction surgery for men, frequently referred to as gynecomastia, is a procedure used to correct enlarged or over developed breasts in men. This condition is quite common in men of many ages. It can result from heredity conditions, hormonal conditions, certain diseases, or be due to the use of certain drugs.

If your goal is to improve your appearance, you are surely aware that this procedure can have far-reaching consequences. A refinement of your face can make a substantive difference, not only in your sense of self-worth, and therefore in your personality, but in your personal and professional relationships. Clearly, a rhinoplasty is not something you want to have performed at a bargain rate. By the same token, nobody wants to be taken advantage of, either by a retailer or a medical professional. This is why it is wise to be diligent in your research before choosing a rhinoplasty surgeon.

On average, the surgeon’s fee for rhinoplasty is around $3,500. This amount does not include the facility or anesthesia fees, or additional expenses that may be required for patients undergoing rhinoplasty. The anesthesia costs are usually between $600 and $1,000, and the facility fee between $700 and $1,100. The total cost of rhinoplasty usually averages between $5,000 and $10,000.


The geographic location of the surgeon's practice can greatly affect the cost of rhinoplasty. More affluent cities and neighborhoods, such as Manhattan and Los Angeles, are plastic surgery hubs where some of the best surgeons in the world practice. Meanwhile, these areas also have a higher cost of living, which means higher overhead costs (rent, staff wages, utilities), and that translates to a higher overall price of rhinoplasty.
At the same time, patients will also need to avoid certain foods and supplements, which could slow healing and cause surgical complications. In particular, patients should steer clear of vitamin E supplements, ginger, gingko, and ginseng. Some homeopathic and herbal supplements can cause complications with anesthesia, so patients should check with their doctors before taking additional nutrition.
The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.

To perform fat grafting, a doctor uses liposuction to remove unwanted fat cells from another part of the body. Then he or she will purify the cells and inject them at varying depths in the face to create more defined cheekbones and a youthful appearance. Dermal fillers add volume to the face, and in some cases, they can even increase collagen production. The results can last for months, and patients may undergo routine touchups.
It is also possible for implants to rupture and leak. If saline implants rupture, the saline will be safely absorbed by the body. A silicone leak may stay inside the implant shell or leak outside of the shell. When a saline implant ruptures, it will deflate. But silicone breast implants may cause no obvious symptoms when they rupture. This is called silent rupture.

In general, silicone-gel-filled implants are smoother, softer and feel more like natural breast tissue than their saline-filled counterparts. Silicone implants feel like a semisolid gel, while saline implants are often likened to water balloons. Silicone-gel implants are also less likely to wrinkle and ripple than saline breast implants. Wrinkling is actually considered one of the major disadvantages of saline implants. The thinner the woman and the less breast tissue she has, the more likely the saline implant's crinkles and wrinkles will be felt and even seen.
Ambulatory surgical centers are more expensive than private offices. These venues are owned by a third party, and provide everything your surgeon needs to safely perform rhinoplasty and other cosmetic surgery procedures. They typically charge by the hour. Ambulatory surgical center fees are usually around $3,000 or more for a single rhinoplasty procedure.
During their consultation with a plastic surgery center or facility, a patient should speak with a financial consultant who will itemize each individual element that a quoted price includes. In the end, the total price a patient is quoted for their breast implant procedure should include their initial consultation, anesthesia costs, operating facility fees, the actual implants, the surgeon’s fees, and any post-operative care. In addition to the initial costs, there will also be miscellaneous fees that must be considered. A patient must ensure that they are prepared to pay for any required surgical garments, medical tests, prescriptions and so forth.
No. Rhinoplasty is a challenging operation. This is due to several factors. First, the nose is a complicated 3D shape that is in the middle of the face. Changes made during rhinoplasty are often very small. But these changes can make a major difference in the way the nose looks and functions. Because these changes are small, so is the margin for error.
A revision rhinoplasty is a complicated surgery, because the surgeon now has to contend with thick scar tissue—which makes it difficult to raise the skin and soft tissue off the cartilage. “Plus, we often need to reconstruct part of the nose, so we need to take cartilage from other sources,” says Dr. Miller. Surgeons say that the minimum amount of time to wait before you can do revision rhinoplasty, even if there is an obvious problem, is a full year. 
Silicone-filled Breast Implants. Silicone-filled breast implants are filled with a silicone gel. Over the years, the consistency of this silicone filling has changed. The first silicone breast implants were filled with a very thin, oily silicone. Currently, the silicone used in implants is a gel that is less likely to leak out of the shell if it ruptures. This gel is referred to as "cohesive." Some breast implants — called gummy bear breast implants — are even more cohesive, or "form-stable," and have the consistency of a gummy bear, thus the nickname.
Rhinoplasty procedures can include the removal of bone, cartilage, or the addition of synthetic tissues, to increase or decrease the size of various elements of the nose. The visual effects may be subtle or dramatic, depending on your needs and desires. The exact techniques used for your procedure depends on the current shape and size of your nose and the desired results; no two rhinoplasty procedures are exactly the same.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.

There are two types of breast implants approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): silicone-filled and saline-filled. They come in various sizes and shapes, and with two types of shells: textured shells and smooth shells. A type of silicone-filled implant with a thicker filling, called a form-stable highly cohesive implant, or "gummy bear" breast implant, is currently under investigation and may one day provide another option for women undergoing breast augmentation with implants.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
In the initial surgical consultation, patients should discuss their specific needs and aesthetic goals to ensure that these goals are realistic. While rhinoplasty can achieve dramatic results, the procedure will not completely alter a patient's appearance. Rather, it is intended to enhance an individual's beauty and correct minor to moderate imperfections. Fortunately, even small changes can have major, positive effects on a patient's overall appearance.
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