One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.
Although the majority of cosmetic procedures are not paid for by health insurance providers, there are some cases in which a breast reduction procedure will be. This is especially true in cases wherein overly developed breasts cause back and neck pain or other health issues. Before a procedure is scheduled, a prospective patient should consult their insurance policy to determine which expenses they must pay for out of pocket. Some insurance providers will require the plastic surgeon to provide documentation before a breast reduction procedure will be approved. Restrictions may be implemented regarding the type of surgical technique utilized in addition to other details about the procedure.
No. Rhinoplasty is a challenging operation. This is due to several factors. First, the nose is a complicated 3D shape that is in the middle of the face. Changes made during rhinoplasty are often very small. But these changes can make a major difference in the way the nose looks and functions. Because these changes are small, so is the margin for error.
Because the nose plays such a prominent role in the facial structure, many patients choose to have additional treatments along with their nose jobs. These procedures can help to maintain the balance of the face and provide more dramatic results. In most cases, combining rhinoplasty with one or more additional treatments is quite safe. However, to ensure safety and good results, patients should choose surgeons who are experienced in all areas of facial plastic surgery.
Some common reasons why you might consider secondary rhinoplasty include, too much tissue was removed from the nostrils, the bridge of your nose was not narrowed enough, or the tip was upturned more than you wanted it to. Secondary rhinoplasty procedures are also recommended for those who have encountered complications such as difficulty breathing through the nose as a result of their first surgery.

After the patient is sedated, the surgeon creates tiny incisions inside the nostrils or on the columella. Then he or she carefully lifts the skin to access the underlying bone and cartilage. The surgeon can then remove or graft tissues, as needed. Typically, a doctor uses conservative methods to minimize the impact to the surrounding tissues while still achieving the desired results. When the reshaping process is complete, the doctor lays the skin back down over the new contours of the nose and closes the incisions.


The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas. 
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