A breast implant is a prosthesis used to change the size, shape, and contour of a person's breast. In reconstructive plastic surgery, breast implants can be placed to restore a natural looking breast mound for post–mastectomy breast reconstruction patients or to correct congenital defects and deformities of the chest wall. They are also used cosmetically to enhance or enlarge the appearance of the breast through breast augmentation surgery.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.

The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.


The 1992 ban was enacted because the FDA determined that not enough data was available to prove that the implants were safe. Since then, numerous studies have found no increased risk of breast cancer, connective tissue diseases, neurological diseases and other illnesses in women with breast implants. Studies involving thousands of women are ongoing to evaluate the safety and effective of silicone gel breast implants.
Placing the breast implants on top of the muscle, which has been the traditional procedure, can result in a slightly higher risk of contraction. This issue is a cosmetic problem, rather than a medical or health issue. Gel/Silicone implants have been placed both above and below the muscle without a significant difference in the rates of having contraction.
The simple answer to the risk of losing sensation in the breast and nipple is that your chances of this are very low, somewhere between 1-2%. The incision is made in an area that doesn’t have any sensory nerves as a precautionary measure to minimize any potential risk to loss of sensation. Furthermore, the breast tissue itself is not cut. It is moved aside so that a space can be created for the implant, and then the implant is placed in the newly created opening. There have been some cases where sensation has been increased with the nipple and areola due to the implant pushing them forward.

When a breast mass is discovered, a biopsy is usually necessary. If you have had breast enlargement with a breast lift, care must be taken to avoid damaging the underlying implant. Sharp instruments must not come in contact with the implant due to the risk of implant rupture. Tell your physician you have had breast implant surgery so they can take appropriate precautions.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
Transumbilical: a trans-umbilical breast augmentation (TUBA) is a less common implant-device emplacement technique wherein the incision is at the umbilicus (navel), and the dissection tunnels superiorly, up towards the bust. The TUBA approach allows emplacing the breast implants without producing visible scars upon the breast proper; but makes appropriate dissection and device-emplacement more technically difficult. A TUBA procedure is performed bluntly—without the endoscope's visual assistance—and is not appropriate for emplacing (pre-filled) silicone-gel implants, because of the great potential for damaging the elastomer silicone shell of the breast implant during its manual insertion through the short (~2.0 cm) incision at the navel, and because pre-filled silicone gel implants are incompressible, and cannot be inserted through so small an incision.[75]
One investigation from 2003 tried to decide if Botox infusions under and around the eyes could diminish the presence of wrinkles in these regions. Nineteen female members gotten infusions. The individuals who had them in the lower eyelids and crow’s feet territory will probably report positive outcomes than the individuals who just gotten infusions in their lower eyelids.
the third technological development was the double lumen breast implant device, a double-cavity prosthesis composed of a silicone breast implant contained within a saline breast implant. The two-fold, technical goal was: (i) the cosmetic benefits of silicone-gel (the inner lumen) enclosed in saline solution (the outer lumen); (ii) a breast implant device the volume of which is post-operatively adjustable. Nevertheless, the more complex design of the double-lumen breast implant suffered a device-failure rate greater than that of single-lumen breast implants. The contemporary versions of second-generation breast implant devices (presented in 1984) are the "Becker Expandable" models of breast implant, which are primarily used for breast reconstruction.
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