Thoroughly research surgeons who meet certain criteria before settling on one. First, make sure the surgeon is certified from the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Be wary of other “boards” that are not legitimate. Your doctor should also be a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, both of which have a very high standard of criteria and maintenance. Then make sure that the surgeon has experience in the type of surgery you’re wanting. Ask to see a body of their work and before-and-after photos. Speak to other patients. Schedule a consultation and get a feel for the surgeon’s approach.
Platinum is a catalyst used in the making of silicone implant polymer shells and other silicone devices used in medicine. The literature indicates that small amounts of platinum leaches (leaks) from these implants and is present in the surrounding tissue. The FDA reviewed the available studies from the medical literature on platinum and breast implants in 2002 and concluded there was little evidence suggesting toxicity from platinum in implant patients.[67] The FDA revisited this study and additional literature several years later, reaffirming prior conclusions that platinum catalysts used in implants is likely not ionized and therefore would not represent a risk to women.[68]

There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.
Both saline-filled breast implants and silicone-filled implants have an outer shell composed of silicone elastomer. This shell is basically a flexible envelope that contains the implant filling. In the case of some anatomically shaped implants, the shell also gives the implants shape. Some models of implants have a "double lumen." This is an elastomer envelope inside of another elastomer envelope (sort of like double-bagging your groceries) which may reduce the risk of implant rupture.
A lot of patients are concerned over whether or not breast implants are safe. The answer to this is yes. To date there has never been a single study performed anywhere in the world that says that breast implants are dangerous or increase your risk of either breast cancer or any other systemic diseases. Furthermore, the new implants whether saline or silicone are manufactured much better than they used to be 10 or 15 years ago which not only makes them safer but has extended their lifetime use. Even the silicone envelope that encompasses the material inside, whether saline or silicone, is much more durable than in the past. If you do chose to go with silicone implants, even in the case of a rupture, the silicone does not leak to a distant site or go into your bloodstream.

Since the early 1990s, a number of independent systemic comprehensive reviews have examined studies concerning links between silicone gel breast implants and claims of systemic diseases. The consensus of these reviews (outlined below under Safety of Breast Implants heading) is that there has been no evidence of a causal link between the implantation of saline or silicone breast implants and systemic disease After investigating this issue, the U.S. FDA has concurred and since reaffirmed that “the weight of the epidemiological evidence published in the literature does not support an association between fibromyalgia and breast implants.”. A comprehensive systemic review by Lipworth (2011) [66] concludes that "any claims that remain regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs are not supported by the scientific literature".
Breast lift surgery, also called mastopexy, is a procedure to lift the breasts in order to rejuvenate a woman’s figure and provide a breast profile that is youthful in appearance. A breast lift raises and firms the breasts by removing excess skin and tightening the surrounding tissue to reshape and support the new breast contour. Sometimes the areola becomes enlarged over time, and a breast lift can reduce this as well.
There’s saline, silicone, “gummy bear” (aka cohesive gel), and autologous fat, explains Dr. Rowe. For the latter, you’ll need around two to three pounds of fat to inject into the chest, and patients often need touch-ups to achieve symmetry. With saline, the implant ripples more, and some patients think that it feels heavier. If a saline implant ruptures, it’s absorbed into your body safely; however, the difference is very noticeable, so you’d likely want to see a doctor ASAP anyway, explains Dr. Doft. Silicone tends to feel more natural, hold its shape, and ripple less. Dr. Doft says the majority of her patients choose silicone.

The surgical scars of a breast augmentation mammoplasty develop approximately at 6-weeks post-operative, and fade within months. Depending upon the daily-life physical activities required of the woman, the breast augmentation patient usually resumes her normal life at 1-week post-operative. Moreover, women whose breast implants were emplaced beneath the chest muscles (submuscular placement) usually have a longer, slightly more painful convalescence, because of the healing of the incisions to the chest muscles. Usually, she does not exercise or engage in strenuous physical activities for approximately 6 weeks. During the initial post-operative recovery, the woman is encouraged to regularly exercise (flex and move) her arm to alleviate pain and discomfort; if required, analgesic indwelling medication catheters can alleviate pain[80][81] Moreover, significantly improved patient recovery has resulted from refined breast-device implantation techniques (submuscular, subglandular) that allow 95 per cent of women to resume their normal lives at 24-hours post-procedure, without bandages, fluid drains, pain pumps, catheters, medical support brassières, or narcotic pain medication.[82][83][84][85]


For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.
Dr. Larry Fan is a Harvard educated, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon in San Francisco, CA. He is a Master Artist who is known for creating beautiful, stunning, and natural results. Dr. Fan has been named One of America's Top Plastic Surgeons for the past 10 years running and has received several national awards for his work in Plastic Surgery. He has successfully performed more than 10,000 cosmetic procedures of the face, breasts, and body over a 20 year period. Dr Fan has been an invited speaker at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons, and has been featured in national media outlets such as CNN, NBC, and ABC.

However, if a patient underwent surgery in another country, but experiences post-operative complications, he or she will need to pay to travel back to the same destination if they wish to have the same doctor oversee any revisions. Revision surgery performed by a different surgeon is extremely difficult, and thus more expensive. In fact, it can cost 50 percent more than the original surgery. Therefore, it can actually be far more economical to pay for a surgery within the U.S.


This type of decisions is not one that should be made in a rush or without the proper research. Typically, individuals considering having a breast augmentation have been considering this as an option and doing their research for at least a year to a year and a half. During this time, it is important to do as much research as possible in regards to what size implants they want/need, what positioning they are wanting, what type of implant that want to use, and the end result they are looking for. For some individuals they are only looking to accentuate what they already have, restore their breast after having children or losing weight, or they want a more enhanced look.

In the early 1990s, the national health ministries of the listed countries reviewed the pertinent studies for causal links among silicone-gel breast implants and systemic and auto-immune diseases. The collective conclusion is that there is no evidence establishing a causal connection between the implantation of silicone breast implants and either type of disease. The Danish study Long-term Health Status of Danish Women with Silicone Breast Implants (2004) reported that women who had breast implants for an average of 19 years were no more likely to report an excessive number of rheumatic disease symptoms than would the women of the control group.[26] The follow-up study Mortality Rates Among Augmentation Mammoplasty Patients: An Update (2006) reported a decreased standardized mortality ratio and an increased risk of lung cancer death among breast implant patients, than among patients for other types of plastic surgery; the mortality rate differences were attributed to tobacco smoking.[27] The study Mortality Among Canadian Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants (2006), about some 25,000 women with breast implants, reported a 43 per cent lower rate of breast cancer among them than among the general populace, and a lower-than-average risk of cancer.[28]
Silicone gel filled breast implants consist of a silicone elastomer (rubber) shell pre-filled with a cohesive, gelatin-like substance that holds together uniformly while still retaining the natural give of breast tissue. Silicone gel breast implants are available in a wide range of sizes to accommodate women with different body types and aesthetic goals. Projections from moderate to high provide you with choices for the amount of projection of the breast silhouette.
When talking about the price with your plastic surgeon, it’s important to know exactly what the cost covers. Is it just the surgeon’s fee? Or will it cover anesthesia, facility fees, implant cost, medical tests, pre- or post-op appointments, and medical supplies you’ll need during recovery? Do you need to purchase a specific bra for recovery or will they provide one?
Ambulatory surgical centers are more expensive than private offices. These venues are owned by a third party, and provide everything your surgeon needs to safely perform rhinoplasty and other cosmetic surgery procedures. They typically charge by the hour. Ambulatory surgical center fees are usually around $3,000 or more for a single rhinoplasty procedure.

It is also possible for implants to rupture and leak. If saline implants rupture, the saline will be safely absorbed by the body. A silicone leak may stay inside the implant shell or leak outside of the shell. When a saline implant ruptures, it will deflate. But silicone breast implants may cause no obvious symptoms when they rupture. This is called silent rupture.
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