As with any sort of surgery there are always risks involved. The two most common risks for breast implant surgery are bleeding and infection. In general, the risk of bleeding is very low, and if it does happen, it will typically happen within the first 24 hours. Infection on the other hand, can take up to one to two weeks to before it will show itself. However, we take every possible precaution such as; using sterile equipment, sterile gowns, gloves, masks and many other safety precautions. The risk of infection is typically anywhere from two to three percent. So yes, there are risks and they can happen but they are very rare. One other risk that needs to be mentioned is the risk of using anesthesia. So yes, it can happen, but it’s exceedingly rare.

There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.


Am I happy with my breast size when wearing a bra? A breast lift alone will not significantly change the size of your breasts. It can help your breasts look fuller, rounder, and better in a bra, but if you would like your breasts to be larger or smaller, a breast lift in conjunction with a breast augmentation or reduction may be the right option for you.
So what is the ideal age for botox? ‘There is no recommended age’, Wallace says, and Victoria Spyrou, the injectables expert at EF MediSpa agrees, ‘The recommended age differs because everyone’s muscles present differently. If someone at the age of 21 has visible dynamic lines that are causing a problem, then I will treat that person, however, if another 21-year-old comes in without any visible lines – I would decline to treat them.’

Both breast reduction and breast lift surgeries are similar in that they both serve to reshape the breasts. Breast lift, through any of the various techniques, basically serves to reposition the breast and nipple on the chest to reverse the effects of time and gravity. The same changes that are noted in ptotic, or sagging, breasts are often seen in large breasts that require reduction: the nipple position is often low and there is excess skin (in addition to the excess breast tissue). The breast reduction then combines a lift with removal of extra tissue to create a breast that has a higher nipple position, reduced extra skin, and smaller and more balanced breast size.
Meeting with multiple prospective surgeons is also a great way to make your choice. Make sure you are comfortable speaking to the surgeon, and make sure he or she asks you plenty of questions, and does not rush you through any part of the consultation. After you have fully described your goals, the surgeon should provide you with informative, thoroughly explained options.
Complications after breast lifts are relatively rare. The main three are bleeding, infection, and scarring. Your surgeon will give you instructions for preparing that will help lower your risk of complications. Those instructions will include such things as not smoking, making sure you are off medications that may make bleeding more likely, and taking antibiotics if necessary.
A lot of patients are concerned over whether or not breast implants are safe. The answer to this is yes. To date there has never been a single study performed anywhere in the world that says that breast implants are dangerous or increase your risk of either breast cancer or any other systemic diseases. Furthermore, the new implants whether saline or silicone are manufactured much better than they used to be 10 or 15 years ago which not only makes them safer but has extended their lifetime use. Even the silicone envelope that encompasses the material inside, whether saline or silicone, is much more durable than in the past. If you do chose to go with silicone implants, even in the case of a rupture, the silicone does not leak to a distant site or go into your bloodstream.
In the early 1990s, the national health ministries of the listed countries reviewed the pertinent studies for causal links among silicone-gel breast implants and systemic and auto-immune diseases. The collective conclusion is that there is no evidence establishing a causal connection between the implantation of silicone breast implants and either type of disease. The Danish study Long-term Health Status of Danish Women with Silicone Breast Implants (2004) reported that women who had breast implants for an average of 19 years were no more likely to report an excessive number of rheumatic disease symptoms than would the women of the control group.[26] The follow-up study Mortality Rates Among Augmentation Mammoplasty Patients: An Update (2006) reported a decreased standardized mortality ratio and an increased risk of lung cancer death among breast implant patients, than among patients for other types of plastic surgery; the mortality rate differences were attributed to tobacco smoking.[27] The study Mortality Among Canadian Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants (2006), about some 25,000 women with breast implants, reported a 43 per cent lower rate of breast cancer among them than among the general populace, and a lower-than-average risk of cancer.[28]

Periareolar: a border-line incision along the periphery of the areola, which provides an optimal approach when adjustments to the IMF position are required, or when a mastopexy (breast lift) is included to the primary mammoplasty procedure. In periareolar emplacement, the incision is around the medial-half (inferior half) of the areola's circumference. Silicone gel implants can be difficult to emplace via periareolar incision, because of the short, five-centimetre length (~ 5.0 cm) of the required access-incision. Aesthetically, because the scars are at the areola's border (periphery), they usually are less visible than the IMF-incision scars of women with light-pigment areolae; when compared to cutaneous-incision scars, the modified epithelia of the areolae are less prone to (raised) hypertrophic scars.


There is no “magic” diet that needs to be started or followed for you to have surgery, however, it is recommended to practice eating a healthy diet and being physically active on a regular basis. It is important that leading up to the surgery date, you don’t eat any foods that your body will not tolerate, such as; spicy foods or foods that may cause any gastric upset or distress. In terms of lifestyle changes, it is recommended that you have a healthy lifestyle which consists of a balanced diet and exercise with a goal to maintain a health body mass index somewhere between 25 and 30. This will only help to optimize your surgical results, however there is not specific diet or regiment that needs to be followed to have breast implant surgery.
This average total, according to the 2016 statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, is based on the surgeon’s fee only and does not include the cost of anesthesia, facilities, and materials (stitches, bandages, drapes, etc.). The price will also depend on doctor, patient, and region. The cost of reduction, though, varies greatly patient to patient. A reduction procedure could take three to four times longer than an augmentation, and the cost would reflect that.
The ASPS and the Plastic Surgery Foundation (PSF) have partnered with the FDA to study this condition and in doing so created the Patient Registry and Outcomes For breast Implants and anaplastic large cell Lymphoma Etiology and epidemiology (PROFILE). The United States FDA strongly encourages all physicians to report cases to PROFILE in an effort to better understand the role of breast implants in ALCL and the management of this disease.[74]
Subfascial: the breast implant is emplaced beneath the fascia of the pectoralis major muscle; the subfascial position is a variant of the subglandular position for the breast implant.[77] The technical advantages of the subfascial implant-pocket technique are debated; proponent surgeons report that the layer of fascial tissue provides greater implant coverage and better sustains its position.[78]
Body type is a major factor you need to consider before going for breast augmentation. The wrong size of breasts for a particular body type can create many complications like neck and back pain. If your body is small in size and your bone structure is thin, don’t go for huge sized implants. Opt for the size that will make your body look proportional. Similarly if you have a heavy body, you might have to go for larger breast implants. 

You will want to spend some time researching a qualified surgeon and examine their before and after rhinoplasty photos so see the quality of their work. Scheduling a consultation with the surgeon would be a great next step to speak to them about their credentials and what their recommendations may be. During the consultation process you can also discover where the procedure would be performed. This will also play a role in total cost.
There are a few alternatives to breast augmentation with implants. Fat grafting breast augmentation involves harvesting fat via liposuction from another area of your body and injecting it into your breasts. Fat grafting is typically used to improve the appearance of your breasts after surgery to treat breast cancer, to correct a congenital breast deformity or to even out any imperfections occurring after breast augmentation with implants, such as wrinkles or ripples. The long-term effects of fat grafting to a normal breast are not fully understood, and the degree of augmentation possible via grafting is only modest at best. For these reasons, fat grafting for cosmetic breast augmentation is still considered experimental by many plastic surgeons.
Smooth breast implants are round in shape, come in many sizes and are available with different profiles, which is the amount of projection of the breast silhouette from the chest. The shells of smooth breast implants are slightly thinner than textured implants. Smooth implants are less likely to cause rippling of the implant shell and are less likely to rupture.
A lot of patients are concerned over whether or not breast implants are safe. The answer to this is yes. To date there has never been a single study performed anywhere in the world that says that breast implants are dangerous or increase your risk of either breast cancer or any other systemic diseases. Furthermore, the new implants whether saline or silicone are manufactured much better than they used to be 10 or 15 years ago which not only makes them safer but has extended their lifetime use. Even the silicone envelope that encompasses the material inside, whether saline or silicone, is much more durable than in the past. If you do chose to go with silicone implants, even in the case of a rupture, the silicone does not leak to a distant site or go into your bloodstream.
Am I happy with my breast size when wearing a bra? A breast lift alone will not significantly change the size of your breasts. It can help your breasts look fuller, rounder, and better in a bra, but if you would like your breasts to be larger or smaller, a breast lift in conjunction with a breast augmentation or reduction may be the right option for you.
One advantage of liposuction is that it won’t give you scars or loss of nipple sensation. Women who are in their menopausal years are the best candidates for liposuction because the fat content of the breasts increases during these years. Your skin has to have excellent elasticity for liposuction to work well. You also have to have a normally positioned nipple.

There are two types of breast implants approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): silicone-filled and saline-filled. They come in various sizes and shapes, and with two types of shells: textured shells and smooth shells. A type of silicone-filled implant with a thicker filling, called a form-stable highly cohesive implant, or "gummy bear" breast implant, is currently under investigation and may one day provide another option for women undergoing breast augmentation with implants.


A breast lift, also known as a mastopexy, is most beneficial for women who have sagging breasts. This type of procedure reshapes and supports the breast tissue to achieve a more youthful figure. It also helps restore the shape and volume that may have been lost due to age, weight loss or breastfeeding. Because a breast lift repositions the location of the breasts, they can appear smaller. However, only excess skin is removed, not the actual breast tissue. Often with breast lifts, the nipple and areolas are repositioned and reduced in size to create a more natural look.

Since the early 1990s, a number of independent systemic comprehensive reviews have examined studies concerning links between silicone gel breast implants and claims of systemic diseases. The consensus of these reviews (outlined below under Safety of Breast Implants heading) is that there has been no evidence of a causal link between the implantation of saline or silicone breast implants and systemic disease After investigating this issue, the U.S. FDA has concurred and since reaffirmed that “the weight of the epidemiological evidence published in the literature does not support an association between fibromyalgia and breast implants.”. A comprehensive systemic review by Lipworth (2011) [66] concludes that "any claims that remain regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs are not supported by the scientific literature".
The presence of radiologically opaque breast implants (either saline or silicone) might interfere with the radiographic sensitivity of the mammograph, that is, the image might not show any tumor(s) present. In this case, an Eklund view mammogram is required to ascertain either the presence or the absence of a cancerous tumor, wherein the breast implant is manually displaced against the chest wall and the breast is pulled forward, so that the mammograph can visualize a greater volume of the internal tissues; nonetheless, approximately one-third of the breast tissue remains inadequately visualized, resulting in an increased incidence of mammograms with false-negative results.[102]
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices and breast implantation may not be a one-time surgery. The most common complications for breast augmentation and reconstruction with MemoryGel® Implants include any reoperation, capsular contracture, and implant removal with or without replacement. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast augmentation include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and ptosis. The most common complications with MemoryShape® Implants for breast reconstruction include reoperation for any reason, implant removal with or without replacement, and capsular contracture. A lower risk of complication is rupture. The health consequences of a ruptured silicone gel breast implant have not been fully established. MRI screenings are recommended three years after initial implant surgery and then every two years after to detect silent rupture. The most common complications with MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants include reoperation, implant removal, capsular contracture, breast pain, and implant deflation.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.
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